Traffic Safety is Going Green

In honor of Earth Day, and upcoming Arbor Day, we wanted to share a positive change from the devastating COVID pandemic and how Traffic Safety is Going Green. By going virtual for our Traffic Safety Team meetings, we reduced our paper consumption and waste. This simple act of green saved over 30,000 sheets of paper during the last year.

Eliminating printed meeting packages, presentations and newsletters reduced paper usage substantially. Saving the files digitally also allows for team members to view the materials before, during and after a meeting. This is also a great resource for those who were unable to attend the virtual meeting. We saved paper and ink and we offered a new digital service for our Community Traffic Safety advocates.

The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two’s Community Traffic Safety Program hosted online monthly county team meetings, and districtwide summer and winter virtual gatherings over the past year. This gave an opportunity for team members and partners throughout our 18 counties to connect safely, while also reducing their carbon footprint and gas consumption by not traveling by car.

Our Traffic Safety Teams are on the road to safety and happy to go green. With the use of digital devices and online resources, the trend of helping save our planet and going green can continue regardless of where or how we meet in the future.

More Seasons of Safety, including this Go Green for Earth Day image can be found by clicking here.

Recipes for the Road

Welcome to our 24th Annual Recipes for the Road! This year’s edition is a 20-page digital recipe booklet filled with nonalcoholic drinks, mocktails, appetizers and treats along with traffic safety tips. Our goal is to help stop impaired driving and reduce alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities in Northeast Florida this holiday season and throughout the year. See below for over two decades of past editions.

Recipes for the Road is part of our Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program. They focus on the SHSP strategies of both education and insight into creating safer communities. They are specifically designed to work with local partners including law enforcement, team members, restaurants, and bars to promote responsible alcohol service and personal use at events or party hosting. They also promote safe transportation choices that encourage alternatives to driving while impaired.

Click here to view the digital flip-book online.

Be Responsible – Do Not Drink and Drive

Thanksgiving through the New Year is a fun and festive time of year. Throughout this fall and winter season there are many celebrations, family gatherings, festivals, football pre-game tailgating and holiday parties. They are all best enjoyed when we celebrate responsibly. Please always drive safe and sober.

Please share and enjoy all these mocktails, food recipes, safety activity games and traffic safety tips. Click here to view our Mocktail drink and food recipe videos available online.


Previous Recipes for the Road Editions

Our past booklets from last year to the inaugural issue in 1997! Click on the titles below to view or download a PDF copy from these past editions:

National School Bus Safety Week

This year’s National School Bus Safety Week (NSBSW) takes place October 18-22, 2021. The Northeast Florida Community Traffic Safety Program is highlighting school bus safety tips and information to share. Please join us in advocating for school bus safety to reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities on our roadways.

Every year, approximately 440,000 public school buses travel more than 4 billion miles and daily transport 24 million children to and from schools and school-related activities. School buses account for an estimated 10 billion student trips each year.*

School's Open - Drive Carefully art

Also in honor of National School Bus Safety Week, we would like to thank all bus drivers and also acknowledge the shortage in our local communities. We appreciate everyone working together to make sure children get to school and back home safely. 

School Bus Safety Rules for Drivers

  • Learn and obey the school bus laws in your state.
  • Be sure to acquaint yourself with the flashing light system that school bus drivers use to alert motorists.
  • Yellow flashing lights mean that the school bus is preparing to stop. Motorists should slow down and be ready to stop their vehicles.
  • Red flashing lights and an extended stop arm indicate that the school bus has stopped, and children are boarding or exiting.
  • Two-lane road: all vehicles in both directions must stop.
  • On a divided highway with a raised median, unpaved space, or a physical barrier of at least five feet: vehicles traveling in the opposite direction are not required to stop.
  • Divided highway where no median or barrier exists: all vehicles are mandated to stop.
School bus dangers art

School Bus Safety Reminders for Students

  • Arrive early.
  • Don’t push or cut in line.
  • Stay out of the “danger zone,” 10 steps away from the bus.
  • Wait for the bus driver to open the door before trying to get on.
  • Keep aisle clear of your backpack, bag, or books.
  • Talk quietly during the entire bus ride.
  • Keep your hands, arms, and head inside the bus at all times.
  • Walk in front of the bus to cross the street, never behind it.

National Coalition for Safer Roads introduced the theme Expect the Unexpected. Know the Danger Zone. Click here to check out what they have to offer this year.

Additional Safety Information and Resources for Drivers and Children:

*source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

Traffic Safety Wise Words

The Northeast Florida CTSP launched the Wise Words safety campaign in 2018 with team member Walt Duffany’s Walt’s Wise Words. Walt began working with the District Two CTST when he was an FDOT Lake City shop supervisor. He retired from FDOT in 2015. He now serves as Deputy Reservist Coordinator for Columbia County Fire Rescue as a volunteer. Walt and his family moved to Florida from Watertown, New York in 1986. In New York, he worked for the Town of Adams highway department. He is also a Navy veteran and spent time in Vietnam. Thank you, Walt, for all of your clever safety messages and for your service!

When the campaign launched with Walt’s Wise Words, the graphic consisted of a car with a bumper sticker with a Wise Words slogan. It has since morphed into a campaign with colorful images, graphics and catchy phrases which are all original and created by District Two CTST team members. The traffic safety Wise Words are short, smart messages targeted to drivers. They are focused on a variety of topics like distracted, impaired, tailgating, turn signals, and buckling up. Additional traffic safety campaigns were created for Work Zone Awareness, Occupant Protection, Distracted Driving, Safe Distancing Driving, Stop on Red, and Impaired Driving, among others. 

Share Traffic Safety Wise Words

Be a Community Traffic Safety Team “Virtual Volunteer”. Share these Wise Words on your social media accounts. Don’t forget to tag us! Facebook / Instagram@trafficsafetyteamTwitter / Pinterest / LinkedIn@trafficsafetyfl 

Pedestrian/Bicyclist Countermeasures

Cost Effective Safety Engineering Countermeasures Help Protect Vulnerable Road Users

Presenting Pedestrian/Bicyclist Countermeasures. FDOT District Two CTSP continues the educational countermeasure series based on proven measures of effectiveness by the FHWA. These pieces outline countermeasures to improve safety for people traveling by foot, wheelchair, or bicycle.

Click on the five educational Pedestrian/Bicyclist Countermeasures cards below to download a copy. They may be printed or shared digitally through email or social media with our Traffic Safety Teams, communities, and agencies.

Many of the serious and fatal injuries to pedestrians and bicyclists occur during dark or dusk hours. They also occur outside of marked crosswalks or bicycle lanes. Motorist speed is one of the major factors that can mean the difference between a minor injury and a serious injury or fatality. The traffic safety strategies and treatments of roadway markings, configurations and traffic lights reduce serious injury and fatal crashes. This happens by slowing traffic, allowing more space and safe areas for walkers and cyclists.

Click here for a PDF document of these pedestrian/bicyclist countermeasures cards used in Northeast Florida, provided by the FDOT District Two CTSP.


Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Reducing Pedestrian-Vehicle Crashes:

1. Walkways, shared use paths, and sidewalks improve safety and mobility.

Pedestrian walkways are pathways for use by people traveling by foot or using a wheelchair that are separated from motor vehicle traffic by a space, barrier, or curb and gutter. Northeast Florida integrates and maintains accessible walkways, shared use paths, sidewalks, and roadway shoulders into the transportation system in both urban and rural areas, providing safer spaces for pedestrians to walk.

2. Leading Pedestrian Intervals (LPIs) give pedestrians a head start. 

LPIs allow pedestrians to enter an intersection a few seconds before vehicles get a green light or have priority to turn. Benefits of LPIs include increased visibility of crossing pedestrians, reduced conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles, more likelihood of motorists yielding to pedestrians, and better safety for pedestrians who may be slower to start into the intersection. 

3. Pedestrian crossing islands and medians reduce pedestrian crashes. 

Raised medians and pedestrian crossing islands separate motorized and non-motorized road users. To safely cross a roadway, pedestrians need to estimate vehicle speeds, adjust their walking speed, determine gaps in traffic, and predict vehicle paths. Pavement markings, raised medians, or islands help improve pedestrian safety by allowing walkers to cross one direction of traffic at a time. This proven pedestrian safety countermeasure is used in Northeast Florida in curbed sections of urban and suburban multi-lane roadways. 

4. Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHBs) assist with safe crossing. 

PHBs help pedestrians safely cross busy or higher-speed roadways at midblock crossings and uncontrolled intersections, where a majority of pedestrian fatalities occur. A PHB lets motorists proceed when a pedestrian has cleared the travel lane. For more information and details about PHBs, please visit: trafficsafetyteam.org/pedestrian-hybrid-beacon.

5. Roadway reconfigurations improve safety for all road users. 

A “road diet” typically reconfigures a four-lane undivided road into a three-lane road with a center left-turn lane and two through lanes. This can reduce rear-end, left-turn, and right-angle crashes. It also allows for the installation of pedestrian refuge islands, bicycle lanes, on-street parking, or transit stops. Road diets help calm traffic and provide better mobility and provide access that accommodates the needs of pedestrians with fewer lanes to cross and more space for cyclists.