Be Our Virtual Volunteer

Be a Community Traffic Safety Team “Virtual Volunteer” – It’s as easy as 1, 2, 3.

traffic safety virtual volunteer logo

Become a virtual volunteer! As part of our Northeast Florida Department of Transportation’s Community Traffic Safety Program, we create and share original traffic safety reminders and tips on our social media channels several times per week! Topics include Florida’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan key emphasis areas to work towards zero fatalities and serious injuries on our local roadways.

Each year, we have thousands of combined views and impressions on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, LinkedIn and YouTube, but we need your help.

Join us and help change behavior and save lives! You can do this by:

  • Liking or following us.
  • Sharing or reposting our content (don’t forget to tag and/or mention us).
  • Inviting others to follow us.
  • Repeat!

Connect with the Northeast Florida Community Traffic Safety Team on social media!

Volunteering without being physically present is not new. For years, volunteers have been off-site and have used the telephone, fax and postal mail to communicate. However, the revolution in information technology has opened up many new possibilities for volunteering and giving back to your community.

Even prior to the COVID-19 healthcare crisis and social distancing, there has been an increase in working from home. Virtual volunteering is a wonderful way to take advantage of contributing volunteer work over the internet. Social media has opened the door to expand the reach of our traffic safety tips and campaigns.

Benefits of Virtual Volunteering:

  • Increase community awareness.
  • Minimal investment of your time.
  • Flexible to your schedule with no time constraints.
  • Easy and feels good to send positive messages.
  • Help reduce crashes, injuries and fatalities on your local roadways.

We also love sharing YOUR photos, stories and events! You can email us at TrafficSafetyTeam@dot.state.fl.us. Be sure to let us know how to tag and mention your organization on social media!

traffic safety virtual volunteer thank you
Thank you for your time and consideration!

Traffic Safety Countermeasures

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program in Northeast Florida created an educational countermeasure series based on proven measures of effectiveness by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The three videos below highlight cost effective safety engineering countermeasures which help reduce lane departure crashes and intersection crashes, and protect vulnerable road users.

Lane Departure Countermeasures
Intersection Countermeasures
Pedestrian/Bicyclist Countermeasures

These top three safety emphasis areas are part of Florida’s Strategic Highway Safety Plan and FDOT’s Vital Few safety focus. Fifteen digital cards were created to share, download, and print for Community Traffic Safety Team members, which include the 4E’s (Engineers, Educators, Law Enforcement, and Emergency Medical Personnel), city/county/state agencies, private industries, and local citizens. Visit the three blogposts below for more information and to access the educational cards.

Five Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Preventing Roadway Departures:

  • Curves – Enhanced Delineation (Curve Signs) and Increased Pavement Friction
  • Rumbles – Center Line, Edge Line and Shoulder Rumble Strips and Stripes 
  • Barriers – Roadside and Median Barrier Terminals and Crash Cushions
  • Clear Zone – Clear Zones and Widening Shoulders Provide for a Safe Recovery 
  • SafetyEdgeSM – SafetyEdgeSM Technology Shapes Edge of Pavement at 30 Degrees

Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Reducing Intersection Crashes:

  • Roundabouts Reduce Severe Crashes
  • Backplates with Retroreflective Borders
  • Left and Right Turn Lanes at Intersections Reduce Severe Crashes
  • Well-Timed Yellow Change Intervals Reduce Red-Light Running
  • Benefits of the Flashing Yellow Arrow Left Turn Signal

Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Reducing Pedestrian-Vehicle Crashes:

  • Walkways, Shared Use Paths, and Sidewalks Improve Safety and Mobility
  • Leading Pedestrian Intervals (LPI) Give Pedestrians a Head Start
  • Pedestrian Crossing Islands and Medians Reduce Pedestrian Crashes
  • Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHBs) Assist with Safe Crossing 
  • Road Diets – Roadway Reconfigurations Improve Safety for All Road Users

Additional Resources and Information:

CTSP Flashback FAQ Videos

We produced a new CTSP Flashback FAQ video series that we are excited to share with you. Our CTSP Flashback FAQ videos showcase some timeless Traffic Safety Team talk. After more than 20 years, these clips provide insight into the essence of the CTSP in Northeast Florida that still apply today. 

Watch these six CTSP Flashback FAQ videos and learn the answers to some common questions we receive.

CTSP Flashback FAQ Videos

Flashback FAQ #1 and #2

FAQ #1: What is the Community Traffic Safety Program?
A:
The premise of the program is local communities, solving local problems with state assistance. Our mission is to reduce traffic-related crashes, injuries and fatalities on our roadways. The CTSP is a volunteer organization sponsored by the Florida Department of Transportation. Traffic Safety Team members work together to develop solutions. We commend our partners for their active participation and on-going commitment to traffic safety in our 18 county district. We invite you to be a part of the solution. Help us promote safety on our roadways and move toward zero fatalities.

FAQ #2: What is a Community Traffic Safety Team?
A:
Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs) are locally based groups of highway safety advocates who are committed to solving traffic safety problems through a comprehensive, multi-jurisdictional, multi-disciplinary approach. Members include city, county, state, private industry and citizens. The common goal of each CTST is to reduce the number and severity of traffic crashes within their community.

Flashback FAQ #3 and #4

FAQ #3: How does the CTST solve traffic safety issues?
A:
Northeast Florida CTST members are the eyes and ears on the road, working together to develop solutions and solve traffic safety issues on our roadways. CTSTs are made up of what is termed the four E’s: Education, Enforcement, Engineers and Emergency Medical Services. All of these disciplines add to the richness of each team and allow broad collaboration in the solving of local traffic safety concerns related to drivers, passengers, vehicles, pedestrians, cyclists and roadways.

FAQ #4: Who are the members of a Community Traffic Safety Team?
A:
FDOT District Two CTST members include city, county, state, private industry and citizens. Members are multi-disciplinary – integrating efforts of the four “E” disciplines that work in highway safety, including Engineering, Education/Public Information, Enforcement, and Emergency Medical Services, along with local community partners, businesses, officials and citizens.

Flashback FAQ #5 and #6

FAQ #5: What is the W H A L E Check, Child Passenger Safety Program?
A:
W.H.A.L.E. (We Have A Little Emergency) CHECK – Child Passenger Safety Program was first introduced in May of 2002 in Jacksonville, Florida by the Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two’s Community Traffic Safety Program. W.H.A.L.E. Check is a child passenger safety education and identification program for parents and caregivers in Florida. In the event of an automobile crash, children are often too young to identify themselves or provide helpful information. The W.H.A.L.E. Check informational flyer also includes child safety seat guidelines and safety tips to help prevent injuries in case of a car crash.

FAQ #6: What is the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver Program?
A:
The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program’s annual Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver campaign was created to help reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths and injuries throughout the holiday season. During the week of Christmas through New Year’s Day, local establishments are promoting the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program by displaying the materials provided. The 11×17 full-color posters will be displayed in neighborhood restaurants and bars. The stickers are for servers and bartenders to wear, and for sticking onto table-talkers, menus, and bill holders. (NOTE: Due to the hardships and challenges many local establishments are battling with COVID-19, we are not requiring them to provide free nonalcoholic drinks.)

Traffic Safety Wise Words

The Northeast Florida CTSP launched the Wise Words safety campaign in 2018 with team member Walt Duffany’s Walt’s Wise Words. Walt began working with the District Two CTST when he was an FDOT Lake City shop supervisor. He retired from FDOT in 2015. He now serves as Deputy Reservist Coordinator for Columbia County Fire Rescue as a volunteer. Walt and his family moved to Florida from Watertown, New York in 1986. In New York, he worked for the Town of Adams highway department. He is also a Navy veteran and spent time in Vietnam. Thank you, Walt, for all of your clever safety messages and for your service!

When the campaign launched with Walt’s Wise Words, the graphic consisted of a car with a bumper sticker with a Wise Words slogan. It has since morphed into a campaign with colorful images, graphics and catchy phrases which are all original and created by District Two CTST team members. The traffic safety Wise Words are short, smart messages targeted to drivers. They are focused on a variety of topics like distracted, impaired, tailgating, turn signals, and buckling up. Additional traffic safety campaigns were created for Work Zone Awareness, Occupant Protection, Distracted Driving, Safe Distancing Driving, Stop on Red, and Impaired Driving, among others. 

Share Traffic Safety Wise Words

Be a Community Traffic Safety Team “Virtual Volunteer”. Share these Wise Words on your social media accounts. Don’t forget to tag us! Facebook / Instagram@trafficsafetyteamTwitter / Pinterest / LinkedIn@trafficsafetyfl 

Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon

Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHBs) are designed to help pedestrians safely cross busy or higher-speed roadways at midblock crossings and uncontrolled intersections, where a majority of pedestrian fatalities occur. The PHB is an intermediate option between a flashing beacon and a full pedestrian signal. It assigns right of way and provides positive stop control, and allows motorists to proceed when the pedestrian has cleared the travel lane. 

PHB High-Intensity Activated Crosswalk Operation Guide 

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program developed a simple guide to help explain the process of a PHB for both motorists and pedestrians. Learn what drivers and pedestrians should do when they approach a Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon. 

Click here to download the PDF Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon Guide, watch the video and flip through the digital book below.

Northeast Florida uses PHBs in communities to increase driver awareness of pedestrian crossings at uncontrolled, marked crosswalk locations. They are different from regular pre-timed pedestrian traffic signals as they are only activated when needed by the pedestrian.

PHB Instructions for Drivers and Pedestrians

PHB Step 1 art

STEP 1
• Drivers will see all indication lights are dark when there is no pedestrian waiting to cross, and the pedestrian signal will maintain a “DON’T WALK” symbol.
• Pedestrians who want to cross the street will need to push the button to activate the system.

PHB Step 2 art

STEP 2
• Drivers will see a FLASHING YELLOW light for a few seconds when pedestrians push the button. Drivers should reduce speed and prepare to stop.
• Pedestrians will still see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and should wait.

PHB Step 3 art

STEP 3
• Drivers will see the flashing go to a STEADY YELLOW light, warning them the indication will soon turn to a STEADY RED light.
• Pedestrians continue to see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and should remain waiting.

PHB Step 4 art

STEP 4
• Drivers will see a STEADY RED light, which requires them to STOP at the stop line.
• Pedestrians will then see a “WALK” symbol to cross and should look in both directions to make sure all vehicles are stopped.

PHB Step 5 art

STEP 5
• Drivers will see ALTERNATING FLASHING RED lights, as pedestrians cross the street. During this period, drivers are required to STOP and then they may proceed with caution if crosswalk is clear.
• Pedestrians will see the WALK indication change to a flashing countdown that indicates how much time they have remaining to cross the street.

PHB Step 6 art

STEP 6
• Drivers will see all lights are back to dark at the end of the flashing countdown and may continue to proceed through the crosswalk if it is clear.
• Pedestrians will see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and must push the button to activate the system again.


For more Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon resources and information, visit: FHWA Safety Program.

No Regrets When You DRIVE WITH CARE & CROSS WITH CARE