Traffic Safety Talk Newsletter

Welcome to our Traffic Safety Talk newsletter – the FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) news and information update. Each issue includes recent projects, community outreach events, and safety campaigns. We discuss Traffic Safety Team materials and resources available for members. Digital flipbooks of the most recent newsletters are available. Additionally, we have included the PDF documents below to view current and past editions.

Current Traffic Safety Talk News Update • February 2024 Flip Book:

Click here for the new February Traffic Safety Talk PDF file. In this issue, various topics and projects include:

  • Working to do More in 2024!
  • Community Outreach and Education
  • Efforts from Traffic Safety Partners and Agencies in District Two
  • Target Zero and Buckle Up Banners Raising Awareness
  • Roadway Concern Spotlight – 4E’s at Work in Clay County
  • School Zone Speed Detection Systems Update
  • Upcoming CTST Meetings and SHSP Emphasis Areas
Continue Reading

Move Over or Slow Down

Every January is Move Over Month in Florida. The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program reminds all motorists to obey Florida’s Move Over Law. This law helps to protect those who protect us while they provide essential services in a dangerous environment – the side of the road.

Florida law requires motorists to move over a lane — when they can safely do so — for the following:

  • Stopped law enforcement.
  • Emergency responders.
  • Sanitation and utility service vehicles.
  • Tow trucks or wreckers.
  • Maintenance or construction vehicles with displayed warning lights without advanced signs or channelizing devices.
  • NEW: Disabled vehicles. (effective 1/1/2024)
Move Over or Slow Down
Move Over
Slow down if unable to move over
Pull over for moving emergency and law enforcement vehicles

New Requirements Added to the Move Over Law – Effective January 1, 2024

Florida lawmakers take action to enhance protection for all roadway users. The expanded Move Over law adds three scenarios to Florida’s current law. Motorists will be required to move over if:

  • There is a disabled motor vehicle that is stopped and displaying warning lights or hazard lights.
  • If a vehicle is stopped and is using emergency flares or posting emergency signage.
  • When a vehicle is stopped and one or more persons are visibly present.

Florida’s Move Over Law Expanded in 2021

In addition to first responders, this law also applies to other public servants and roadside workers. Drivers typically know to move over for law enforcement, fire rescue, and emergency medical services. Many still do not realize the law requires them to move over for sanitation, utility, wrecker, maintenance, and construction vehicles. Basically, if motorists see a service vehicle on the side of the road with flashing warning lights, they need to change lanes or slow down.

Florida Law, Move Over and Slow Down for Stopped Emergency and Service Vehicles

The Florida requirement expanding to cover these additional roadway service providers was enacted in July 2021. In 2022, there were 170 crashes and more than 14,000 citations issued for motorists failing to move over in Florida, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV). Obeying Florida’s Move Over law will help ensure all personnel working along our roadways get home safely.

Move Over

  • As soon as it is safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to the stopped law enforcement, emergency, sanitation, utility service vehicles, tow trucks or wreckers, maintenance or construction vehicles with displaying warning lights, and any disabled vehicle on the side of the road when driving on an interstate highway or other highways with two or more lanes.
  • Always signal your intention to change lanes.
  • Be prepared to allow those who are attempting to move over into the next lane.

Slow Down

  • If moving over cannot be safely accomplished, or when on a two-lane road, slow down to a speed that is 20 mph less than the posted speed limit when the posted speed limit is 25 mph or greater, or travel at 5 mph when the posted speed limit is 20 mph or less when driving on a two-lane road.

Violating the Move Over law puts you and others at risk, and a citation will result in a fine, fees, and points on your driving record. To read the Florida Statue, see 316.126 – Operation of vehicles and actions of pedestrians on approach of an authorized emergency, sanitation, or utility service vehicle.

Pull Over for Moving Emergency Vehicles

Motorists should always remember to pay attention while driving and pull over for emergency vehicles approaching from behind. Help protect moving emergency vehicles by:

  • Yielding the right of way
  • Moving to the closest, safety edge of roadway
  • Clearing intersection
  • Remaining stopped until the vehicle has passed

Engineering Concerns

One of the most essential functions of our Traffic Safety Team is identifying problems on our local roadways. You and your colleagues are the experienced “eyes” we need on our local roads. Accordingly, we ask all FDOT District Two Traffic Safety Team members for help reporting traffic safety and engineering concerns.

Engineering Concerns Presentation Video with Examples

As a Traffic Safety Team member, we value your insight and knowledge of your community’s traffic safety issues. For example, some of the safety issues identified include: signs, pavement markings, signals and areas that may benefit from increased enforcement.

Submitting an Engineering Roadway Safety Concern

You and anyone within your organization may submit a traffic safety engineering concern through our Roadway Concerns online form. Please provide your name, email address, and phone number. This information will allow us to contact you to discuss the issue further or get more clarification and provide you with status updates and the final resolution.

Location of Concern

Enter as much information as you can about the location. Please indicate which county the issue is in so it can be forwarded to the appropriate team. If you know which agency owns the roadway, select the appropriate option. If unsure of the agency, simply select Other/Unknown, and we will update the information if needed. For Road Name, identify the primary road. If it is at an intersection, add the name of the intersection (or the closest intersecting road). For better clarification, describe the location using landmarks, direction (North, South, East, West), side of the road, and anything else that would help.

Concern Description

When inputting the concern description, tell us what E-Category:  Engineering, Education, Enforcement, or Emergency Services this concern is related to. Select the primary concern type. And in your own words, describe the roadway concern in as much detail as possible. If you have pictures, videos, or other relevant documents about the issue, please upload them. Sending images or videos is very helpful. Lastly, click the submit button to send your request.  

Submit a NE Florida Engineering Concern

Concern Submissions

After you submit your concern online, a notification is sent to the District 2 Community Traffic Safety Program. The concern is added to the database and assigned to the appropriate agency and E-category.

At the next CTST meeting, we introduce the issue to the team. We investigate the concern in a manner that may include a safety study, operations study, maintenance request, law enforcement deployment/activities, and/or educational initiatives. The issue will be discussed at each subsequent team meeting until the investigation is completed.

We will review the investigation results and the course of action, if any, at a meeting. We will also notify the requestor of the results of the findings and any actions that have or will be taken. If a request is not met or the ending result is not what the requestor was hoping for, please do not take it personally. Of course, we appreciate all of the engineering concerns submitted.

Remember… We Need Your Help

Together, we can solve roadway issues, reduce crashes, and help prevent serious injuries and fatalities. If you see a roadway safety issue in any of our 18 Northeast Florida Counties, please submit it online through the Roadway Concerns form.  Above all, we thank you for your continued commitment to safety!

Additional Resources and Information:

Additionally, you may read this 2018 presentation How to Submit Better Engineering Concerns. Bringing the 4E’s of safety together: Engineering, Education, Emergency Medical Services, and Enforcement.

Districtwide Discussions

Because of numerous requests for our Districtwide Discussion presentations, we are including them below to serve you better, our District Two Traffic Safety Team members. For those who have been following these districtwide hot topics, it’s been a beneficial conversation. While looking at these slides offers a glimmer into the ongoing dialogue, it’s not the same as being present and a part of the discussions.

Thank you to everyone who has joined the conversation across our 18-county district. There has been a lot of valuable input, experience, and expertise from team members. View Florida statutes, local guidelines, ordinances, news articles, reports, and materials submitted by other team members. Please share any new data or information.

November Presentation – School Zone Camera Enforcement and Traffic Safety Roadway Concerns

November’s Districtwide Discussion included a follow-up about the new Florida law allowing camera enforcement of school zone speed limits. FDOT District Two Traffic Operations Engineer, Jim Hannigan, discussed school zone camera enforcement requirements and guidelines, which will be finalized by the end of December. Additionally, an in-depth presentation reviewed traffic safety roadway concerns, submissions, and the process within our Community Traffic Safety Teams in Northeast Florida.

School Zone Speed Detection Systems UPDATE:

Pursuant to Section 316.0776, Florida Statutes, the Department may approve the installation of School Zone Speed Detection Systems on the State Highway System.  Installations of these devices on the State Highway System must be authorized through a General Use Permit.  Please use the link below to access the website to read an overview of the process, the Placement and Installation Guidelines, Frequently Asked Questions, and Special Provisions that will be attached to the General Use Permit.  This process is like the process used for Automated License Plate Recognition (LPR) Systems and Traffic Infraction Detectors (Red Light Running Cameras).  Please refer to this website occasionally because the documents may be updated as this process rolls out.

School Speed Detection System (fdot.gov)


Resources are compiled on these two web pages:

September Presentation – Ongoing Districtwide Discussions

In September, we had a productive dialogue about these ongoing electric micromobility device and golf cart concerns. We covered hot topics in the news (lithium-ion fire hazards and college campus bans on e-bikes/e-scooters), increased injury impacts, developing golf cart crossing, e-scooter research, and ideas for future discussions.


June Presentation – Continuing the Discussion on E-Mobility Devices and Golf Carts

June 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

June’s Districtwide Discussion, Follow-Up on E-Mobility Devices and Golf Carts, we addressed the challenges of collecting data, local regulations, insurance and liability concerns, and designing for safe behaviors.


May Presentation – Golf Cart/LSV Concerns and Follow-Up on E-Mobility Devices

June 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

In May, the Districtwide Discussion presentation introduced concerns in Northeast Florida about street-legal golf carts (low-speed vehicles). We also continued the discussion on the issues regarding electric mobility devices.


April Presentation – Let’s Talk About E-Bikes, E-Scooters, and E-Unicycles

April 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

During the April Districtwide meeting presentation, we discussed the population growth in Florida and existing pedestrian and bicycle crash data. Data documenting e-bike and other electric mobility device crashes and injuries is needed. We looked at other states’ guidelines and local beach communities whom have established ordinances addressing e-bike usage.


This year, we began virtual, open discussion meetings on special topics with Andrea Atran, District Two Community Traffic Safety Program Manager. The goal is to encourage conversations on districtwide issues. The informal gathering is an excellent opportunity for members across our 18-county district to connect, ask questions, and share their expertise. In February, we reviewed safety grants. And in March, we discussed the history of the CTSP and the importance of engineering concerns. This led to concerns regarding micromobility – specifically, e-bikes and e-scooters.

Tackling these topics is a group effort. Bringing everyone together to address issues affecting our communities is what we are about. Additionally, we look forward to future Districtwide Discussions and new topics for collaboration.

Crash Data and 2022 Annual Report

This page includes the most recent FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) Annual Report and Crash Data Reports. Listed below, we provide crash facts for each of the 18 Northeast Florida counties in District Two. We also have combined districtwide totals. This resource is for our local Traffic Safety Team members, partners, and agencies.

CTSP Annual Report

A summary of last year’s Northeast Florida Community Traffic Safety Program and combined crash facts from District Two. This resource may be used and shared among our Traffic Safety Team members, partners, and agencies. In addition to the crash facts for 12 Florida Strategic Highway Safety Plan emphasis areas, we highlight traffic safety efforts and community outreach in 2022 with overviews on topics addressed throughout the year. These reports are a fundamental evaluation tool as we work toward reducing injuries and deaths on our roadways. Together, we can make progress to achieve our target of ZERO.

2022 District Two Crash Data Summaries

The Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) includes roadway, user behavior, and road user emphasis areas. The crash data includes total crashes, fatalities, and injuries for each emphasis area. This year, we changed the format to incorporate demographics and key factors in the crashes. We broke out the crashes by age and gender of the at-fault driver. Also included on each fact sheet are brief takeaway points. Click here to review crash data reports by county and from previous years.

INTERSECTION Crash Data – 2022 Roadway Crash Fact Reports
OCCUPANT PROTECTION Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
IMPAIRED DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
DISTRACTED DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
AGGRESSIVE DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
BICYCLIST Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
PEDESTRIAN Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
MOTORCYCLIST Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
AGING DRIVER Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
TEEN DRIVER Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports

Northeast Florida County Data Resources

We have county crash data available with previous years’ summary reports. Our team materials page has additional resources, information, newsletters, and Florida reports. These resources evaluate and establish traffic safety concerns and trends in Northeast Florida. Our Community Traffic Safety Teams work to make safety improvements with the goal of reducing crashes and saving lives.