Lane Departure Countermeasures

Cost Effective Safety Engineering Countermeasures Help Reduce Lane Departure Crashes 

Many fatal and serious injury crashes in Northeast Florida are a result of lane departures. We have created an educational series of proven safety countermeasures for FDOT District Two Traffic Safety Team members and communities.

These informational pieces can be used to help explain the safety treatments and strategies to prevent lane departures on our local roadways. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has based these proven measures on effectiveness and benefits. Click on the five educational Lane Departure Countermeasure cards below to download and share.

Lane departure crashes include: running off the road, crossing the center median into an oncoming lane of traffic, and sideswipe crashes. Running off the road may also involve a rollover or hitting a fixed object. One of the most severe types of crashes occurs when a vehicle crosses into an opposing traffic lane and crashes head on with an oncoming vehicle. 

A driver who is speeding, distracted, drowsy, or impaired is likely to have difficulty staying in the lane. To reduce the serious injuries and fatalities resulting from lane departures, efforts must be made to: keep vehicles from leaving the road or crossing the center median, reduce the likelihood of vehicles overturning or crashing into roadside objects, and minimize the severity of an overturn.

View and print this PDF document by the FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program of lane departure countermeasures used in Northeast Florida.

Five Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Preventing Roadway Departures:

1. Curves – Enhanced Delineation (Curve Signs) and Increased Pavement Friction 

Advance curve warning signs alert drivers of the severity of the curvature and operating speed, and chevron signs are installed along the curve. High friction surface treatment (HFST) compensates at curves where the available pavement friction is not adequate to support operating speeds. These countermeasure treatments are effective to reduce curve, nighttime and wet road crashes. 

2. Rumbles – Center Line, Edge Line and Shoulder Rumble Strips and Stripes 

Rumble strips are milled elements in the pavement. The vibration (and resulting sound) alerts drivers if they are leaving the travel lane. These rumbles are proven to help reduce roadway departure crashes caused by inattentive, distracted, or drowsy drivers who drift from their lane. 

3. Barriers – Roadside and Median Barrier Terminals and Crash Cushions 

Guardrail barriers help reduce crash severity. They are designed to redirect and slow vehicles while protecting them from obstacles, like opposing traffic, rigid fixed objects, bodies of water, or steep slopes. 

4. Clear Zone – Clear Zones and Widening Shoulders Provide for a Safe Recovery 

Clear zone areas are free of rigid, fixed objects such as trees and light poles. Establishing and maintaining a clear zone provides an unobstructed, traversable area beyond the edge of the road. Widening shoulders allows drivers more recovery time to regain control in the event of a roadway departure. 

5. SafetyEdgeSMSafetyEdgeSM Technology Shapes Edge of Pavement at 30 Degrees 

SafetyEdgeSM is a low cost countermeasure that prevents tire-scrubbing which often results in rollovers, run-off-road and head-on crashes, and allows vehicles to safely return to the travel lane. This paving technique also improves durability and reduces pavement edge drop-off. 

Traffic Safety Subgrants

FY 2022 Subgrant Concept Papers are now being Accepted!

The FDOT District Two, Community Traffic Safety Program would like to remind our traffic safety partners that the FDOT State Safety Office is accepting concept papers for subgrant funding consideration until February 28, 2021.

What are FDOT Subgrants?

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) State Safety Office awards subgrants to traffic safety partners that undertake priority area programs and activities to improve traffic safety and reduce crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. Subgrants may be awarded for assisting in addressing traffic safety deficiencies, expansion of an ongoing activity, or development of a new program.

Subgrants are awarded to state and local safety-related agencies as “seed” money to assist in the development and implementation of programs in traffic safety priority areas. Funding for these subgrants are apportioned to states annually from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) according to a formula based on population and road miles. Occasionally, additional funding may be available for projects in other program areas if there is documented evidence of an identified problem.

Priority areas to improve traffic safety and reduce crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities:
Aging Road Users

Community Traffic Safety
Distracted Driving
Impaired Driving
Motorcycle Safety
Occupant Protection and Child Passenger
Safety Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety
Police Traffic Services
Speed and Aggressive Driving
Teen Driver Safety
Traffic Records
Traffic Record Coordinating Committee (TRCC)
Work Zone Safety

Who is Eligible to Apply for a Subgrant?

Many types of organizations are eligible to receive traffic safety subgrant funding: government agencies, political subdivisions of state, local, city and county government agencies, law enforcement agencies, state colleges and state universities, school districts, fire departments, public emergency service providers, and certain qualified non-profit organizations (e.g., MADD, SADD, etc.).

What is the Funding Cycle?

Subgrants are awarded on a federal fiscal year basis (October 1–September 30). Below is a timeline of the subgrant process.

Timeline of the subgrant process.
  • January 1–Last day of February—Entities interested in applying for funding submit concept papers describing their proposed efforts for the next award cycle beginning October 1.
  • August–September—Entities are notified as to whether or not their concept paper has been selected and additional information on how to complete the Subgrant for Highway Safety Funds.
  • October 1—Subgrant fiscal year begins
  • September 30—Subgrant fiscal year ends

FDOT Overview for Traffic Safety Subgrants

  • Grant applications are DUE February 28, 2021
  • Applications are fully electronic
  • Each agency must assign TWO administrators to use the system
  • Subrecipient administrator request form must be completed
  • Send completed form to Danielle King: danielle.king@dot.state.fl.us

Detailed Information and Resources Available Online

Illegal School Bus Passing Fines Doubled

Effective January 1, 2021, the penalties for failure to stop for a school bus in Florida has doubled. Motorists should always follow the law and drive carefully – especially when driving in school zones and around school buses.

The penalty for failure to stop for a school bus with its stop-arm extended and flashing red lights activated increased to $200 from $100. For a subsequent offense within a five-year period, the motorist will receive a suspended license for no less than 190 days and no more than a year.

The School Bus Safety bill also increases the fine for passing a school bus on the right-hand side, where children are loading and unloading, to $400 from the previous fine of $200. Motorists convicted of a second offense within a five-year period will lose their driver’s license for no less than one year and no more than two.

Mobile Devices Must Be Hands-Free While Driving

Reminder: The Wireless Communications While Driving Law, effective October 1, 2019 prohibits the use of a wireless communications device in a handheld manner while driving in a designated school crossing, school zone, or active work zone area. Violators commit a noncriminal traffic infraction, punishable as a moving violation, that includes a base $60 fine, not including court costs or other fees, and will have 3 points assessed against the driver license.

Please help protect the children in your community and share these important traffic safety laws and school bus safety tips:

School’s Open – Drive Carefully Poster to Print and Share

Additional School Bus Safety Information and Tips

Great school bus safety resources are available online here:
Northeast Florida Traffic Safety Program – School Bus Safety
Florida Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles – School Bus Safety

Recipes for the Road

Welcome to our 23rd Annual Recipes for the Road! This 20-page digital recipe booklet is filled with nonalcoholic drinks, mocktails, appetizers and sweet treats along with traffic safety tips. Our goal is to help stop impaired driving and reduce alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities in Northeast Florida this holiday season and throughout the year.

23rd Annual Recipes for the Road Digital Flip Book:

See below for over two decades of Recipes for the Road editions. Check out our Mocktail drink and food recipe cards and videos!

Recipes for the Road is part of our Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program with local restaurants and bars. Participating locations provide free non-alcoholic beverages to patrons who are the designated driver (AKA the “DD”). Together these printed materials and online resources from FDOT’s District Two Community Traffic Safety Program and local partners work to save lives and prevent injuries in Northeast Florida. Click here for more information about Celebrate Safely.

Be Responsible – Do Not Drink and Drive

Thanksgiving through the New Year is a fun and festive time of year. Throughout this fall and winter season there are many celebrations, family gatherings, festivals, football pre-game tailgating and holiday parties. They are all best enjoyed when we celebrate responsibly. Please always drive safe and sober.

Recipes for the Road was started to help reduce drinking and driving, offering a great collection of non-alcoholic drink recipes. Please feel free to share and enjoy all these mocktails, food recipes, safety activity games and traffic safety tips.

Learn more here: Impaired Driving traffic safety tips and materials.
Share our monthly Mocktails, recipes cards and videos.
Download our Seasons of Safety themed holiday cards.


Previous Recipes for the Road

Our past booklets from last year to the inaugural issue in 1997! Click on the titles below to view or download a PDF copy from these past Recipes for the Road editions:

Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver

2019 Celebrate Safely Artwork

The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program is excited to promote the annual Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver campaign. The popular public service initiative was created to help reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths and injuries throughout the holiday season. Together we can make a difference!

During the week of Christmas through New Year’s Day, local establishments are promoting the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program by displaying the materials provided. The 11×17 full-color posters will be displayed in neighborhood restaurants and bars. The stickers are for servers and bartenders to wear, and for sticking onto table-talkers, menus, and bill holders.

If you know any establishments that would like to participate, please place an order online now.  

order-form

Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver packages for bars and restaurants 

Due to the hardships and challenges many local establishments are battling this year with COVID-19, we are not requiring them to provide free nonalcoholic drinks. The following list of participating restaurant and bars have offered to serve nonalcoholic beverages free-of-charge to patrons who identify themselves as the designated driver during the week of Christmas through New Year’s Day.  


List of 2020 Participating Restaurants and Bars:

Let us know if you or someone you know would also like to participate!


Click on the images below to download and share these free “Celebrate Safely” social media graphics:


The campaign’s “Drive Safe and Drive Sober” message is key at any time of year, and especially during the holidays. If you’ve been drinking, celebrate safely. Designate a driver, call a cab/ride-share/Uber/Lyft, or spend the night where you are.  Make sure to check out the following:
Recipes for the Road: nonalcoholic drinks and safety tips
Mocktails: drink and food recipe cards and videos
Seasons of Safety: traffic safety-themed holiday card collection
Impaired Driving: traffic safety page with more resources and materials


IT’S NOT ALL FUN IN THE SUN

In Florida, you can get a DUI (driving under the influence) if you drive or are in physical control of a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08% or higher – regardless of whether your driving ability was actually impaired. (Sometimes the term “blood alcohol level” (BAL) is used instead of BAC). However, a driver can also get a DUI for driving while impaired to “some degree” as the result of ingesting alcohol, drugs, or any combination of these.

While most DUIs involve driving, it’s possible to get a DUI in Florida without actually moving your vehicle. Florida law makes it illegal not only to drive a vehicle under the influence, but also to “operate” or be in “actual physical control” of a vehicle in such a state of impairment. So, for instance, an intoxicated motorist who’s found by police slumped over the wheel with keys in hand could be prosecuted for DUI even though the car never moved.

And like all other states, Florida has “implied consent” laws that generally require all motorists lawfully arrested for DUI to submit to chemical testing (blood, breath, or urine) for the purpose of determining the amount of alcohol or drugs in their systems.

Every day, 36 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes that involve an alcohol-impaired driver.  This is one death every 41 minutes.  The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes totals more than $51 billion.

Important safety steps we can all take:

  • Before drinking alcohol, designate a non-drinking driver within your group.
  • Don’t let your friends drive impaired.
  • If you have been drinking or using drugs, get a ride home or call a taxi.
  • If you’re hosting a party where alcohol will be served, offer alcohol-free beverages and make sure all guests leave with a sober driver.