Pedestrian/Bicyclist Countermeasures

Cost Effective Safety Engineering Countermeasures Help Protect Vulnerable Road Users

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program in Northeast Florida continues the educational countermeasure series based on proven measures of effectiveness by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). These pieces outline countermeasures to improve safety for people traveling by foot, wheelchair, or bicycle.

Click on the five educational Pedestrian and Bicyclist Countermeasure cards below to download a copy. They may be printed or shared digitally through email or social media with our Northeast Florida Traffic Safety Teams, communities, and agencies.

Many of the serious and fatal injuries to pedestrians and bicyclists occur during dark or dusk hours, and outside of marked crosswalks or bicycle lanes. Motorist speed is one of the major factors that can mean the difference between a minor injury and a serious injury or fatality for a bicyclist or pedestrian. The traffic safety strategies and treatments of roadway markings, configurations and traffic lights reduce serious injury and fatal crashes by slowing traffic, allowing more space and safe areas for walkers and cyclists.

Click here for a PDF document of these pedestrian and bicyclist countermeasures used in Northeast Florida, provided by the FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program.


Traffic Safety Countermeasures that Work in Reducing Pedestrian-Vehicle Crashes:

1. Walkways, Shared Use Paths, and Sidewalks Improve Safety and Mobility

Pedestrian walkways are defined pathways for use by people traveling by foot or using a wheelchair and are separated from motor vehicle traffic by a space, barrier, or curb and gutter. Northeast Florida integrates and maintains accessible walkways, shared use paths, sidewalks, and roadway shoulders into the transportation system in both urban and rural areas to provide safer spaces for pedestrians to walk. 

2. Leading Pedestrian Intervals (LPI) Give Pedestrians a Head Start 

Leading Pedestrian Intervals (LPI) allow pedestrians the opportunity to enter an intersection 3-7 seconds before vehicles are given a green indication. Their presence can be better established in the crosswalk before drivers have priority to turn. Benefits of LPIs include: 
• Increased visibility of crossing pedestrians. 
• Reduced conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles. 
• Increased likelihood of motorists yielding to pedestrians. 
• Enhanced safety for pedestrians who may be slower to start into the intersection. 

3. Pedestrian Crossing Islands and Medians Reduce Pedestrian Crashes 

Raised medians and pedestrian crossing islands (refuge areas) separate motorized and non-motorized road users. Pedestrians need to estimate vehicle speeds, adjust their walking speed, determine gaps in traffic, and predict vehicle paths to safely cross a roadway. The defined pavement markings, raised medians, or islands help improve pedestrian safety by allowing walkers to cross one direction of traffic at a time. This proven pedestrian safety countermeasure is used in Northeast Florida in curbed sections of urban and suburban multi-lane roadways. 

4. Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons (PHBs) Assist with Safe Crossing 

PHBs are designed to help pedestrians safely cross busy or higher-speed roadways at midblock crossings and uncontrolled intersections, where a majority of pedestrian fatalities occur. The PHB is an intermediate option between a flashing beacon and a full pedestrian signal. It assigns right of way and provides positive stop control, and also allows motorists to proceed when the pedestrian has cleared the travel lane. For more information and details about Pedestrian Hybrid Beacons, please visit: trafficsafetyteam.org/pedestrian-hybrid-beacon 

5. Roadway Reconfigurations Improve Safety for All Road Users 

A “Road Diet” typically involves reconfiguring a four-lane undivided roadway into a three-lane roadway consisting of a center left-turn lane and two through lanes. Benefits include a reduction of rear-end, left-turn and right-angle crashes. This configuration also gives the opportunity to install pedestrian refuge islands, bicycle lanes, on-street parking, or transit stops. “Road Diets” help calm traffic and provide better mobility and access that accommodates the needs of pedestrians with fewer lanes to cross and more space for cyclists. 


Traffic Safety Subgrants

FY 2022 Subgrant Concept Papers are now being Accepted!

The FDOT District Two, Community Traffic Safety Program would like to remind our traffic safety partners that the FDOT State Safety Office is accepting concept papers for subgrant funding consideration until February 28, 2021.

What are FDOT Subgrants?

The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) State Safety Office awards subgrants to traffic safety partners that undertake priority area programs and activities to improve traffic safety and reduce crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. Subgrants may be awarded for assisting in addressing traffic safety deficiencies, expansion of an ongoing activity, or development of a new program.

Subgrants are awarded to state and local safety-related agencies as “seed” money to assist in the development and implementation of programs in traffic safety priority areas. Funding for these subgrants are apportioned to states annually from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) according to a formula based on population and road miles. Occasionally, additional funding may be available for projects in other program areas if there is documented evidence of an identified problem.

Priority areas to improve traffic safety and reduce crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities:
Aging Road Users

Community Traffic Safety
Distracted Driving
Impaired Driving
Motorcycle Safety
Occupant Protection and Child Passenger
Safety Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety
Police Traffic Services
Speed and Aggressive Driving
Teen Driver Safety
Traffic Records
Traffic Record Coordinating Committee (TRCC)
Work Zone Safety

Who is Eligible to Apply for a Subgrant?

Many types of organizations are eligible to receive traffic safety subgrant funding: government agencies, political subdivisions of state, local, city and county government agencies, law enforcement agencies, state colleges and state universities, school districts, fire departments, public emergency service providers, and certain qualified non-profit organizations (e.g., MADD, SADD, etc.).

What is the Funding Cycle?

Subgrants are awarded on a federal fiscal year basis (October 1–September 30). Below is a timeline of the subgrant process.

Timeline of the subgrant process.
  • January 1–Last day of February—Entities interested in applying for funding submit concept papers describing their proposed efforts for the next award cycle beginning October 1.
  • August–September—Entities are notified as to whether or not their concept paper has been selected and additional information on how to complete the Subgrant for Highway Safety Funds.
  • October 1—Subgrant fiscal year begins
  • September 30—Subgrant fiscal year ends

FDOT Overview for Traffic Safety Subgrants

  • Grant applications are DUE February 28, 2021
  • Applications are fully electronic
  • Each agency must assign TWO administrators to use the system
  • Subrecipient administrator request form must be completed
  • Send completed form to Danielle King: danielle.king@dot.state.fl.us

Detailed Information and Resources Available Online

Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver

2019 Celebrate Safely Artwork

The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program is excited to promote the annual Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver campaign. The popular public service initiative was created to help reduce alcohol-related traffic deaths and injuries throughout the holiday season. Together we can make a difference!

During the week of Christmas through New Year’s Day, local establishments are promoting the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program by displaying the materials provided. The 11×17 full-color posters will be displayed in neighborhood restaurants and bars. The stickers are for servers and bartenders to wear, and for sticking onto table-talkers, menus, and bill holders.

If you know any establishments that would like to participate, please place an order online now.  

order-form

Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver packages for bars and restaurants 

Due to the hardships and challenges many local establishments are battling this year with COVID-19, we are not requiring them to provide free nonalcoholic drinks. The following list of participating restaurant and bars have offered to serve nonalcoholic beverages free-of-charge to patrons who identify themselves as the designated driver during the week of Christmas through New Year’s Day.  


List of 2020 Participating Restaurants and Bars:

Let us know if you or someone you know would also like to participate!


Click on the images below to download and share these free “Celebrate Safely” social media graphics:


The campaign’s “Drive Safe and Drive Sober” message is key at any time of year, and especially during the holidays. If you’ve been drinking, celebrate safely. Designate a driver, call a cab/ride-share/Uber/Lyft, or spend the night where you are.  Make sure to check out the following:
Recipes for the Road: nonalcoholic drinks and safety tips
Mocktails: drink and food recipe cards and videos
Seasons of Safety: traffic safety-themed holiday card collection
Impaired Driving: traffic safety page with more resources and materials


IT’S NOT ALL FUN IN THE SUN

In Florida, you can get a DUI (driving under the influence) if you drive or are in physical control of a vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08% or higher – regardless of whether your driving ability was actually impaired. (Sometimes the term “blood alcohol level” (BAL) is used instead of BAC). However, a driver can also get a DUI for driving while impaired to “some degree” as the result of ingesting alcohol, drugs, or any combination of these.

While most DUIs involve driving, it’s possible to get a DUI in Florida without actually moving your vehicle. Florida law makes it illegal not only to drive a vehicle under the influence, but also to “operate” or be in “actual physical control” of a vehicle in such a state of impairment. So, for instance, an intoxicated motorist who’s found by police slumped over the wheel with keys in hand could be prosecuted for DUI even though the car never moved.

And like all other states, Florida has “implied consent” laws that generally require all motorists lawfully arrested for DUI to submit to chemical testing (blood, breath, or urine) for the purpose of determining the amount of alcohol or drugs in their systems.

Every day, 36 people in the United States die in motor vehicle crashes that involve an alcohol-impaired driver.  This is one death every 41 minutes.  The annual cost of alcohol-related crashes totals more than $51 billion.

Important safety steps we can all take:

  • Before drinking alcohol, designate a non-drinking driver within your group.
  • Don’t let your friends drive impaired.
  • If you have been drinking or using drugs, get a ride home or call a taxi.
  • If you’re hosting a party where alcohol will be served, offer alcohol-free beverages and make sure all guests leave with a sober driver.

Happy Birthday Nassau County Traffic Safety Team

Hard to believe our youngest Community Traffic Safety Team is already 17 years old!

The Nassau County Traffic Safety Team was established on November 12, 2003 by the Northeast Florida Department of Transportation, District Two’s Community Traffic Safety Program. Together they work with local agencies, engineers, law enforcement, emergency services, educators, citizens and partners to help resolve traffic safety concerns on their roadways.

Watch Nassau CTST’s 17th Year Anniversary Celebration Video:

Towns and cities in Nassau County, include Fernandina Beach, Callahan, Yulee, Hilliard, and Amelia Island. This most northeastern county of Florida has a diverse roadway system traveling through coastal, rural and historic areas. We wish the Nassau County Traffic Safety Team a very “Happy Birthday” and appreciate all of the past and present members for their dedication to promoting traffic safety throughout their communities.

Happy Birthday Columbia County Traffic Safety Team

The Columbia Community Traffic Safety Team has been on the road to safety for 23 years!

Columbia, Hamilton, Lafayette, and Suwannee Counties have been part of FDOT’s Community Traffic Safety Program since August 21, 1997. For over two decades, local law enforcement, emergency service providers, engineers, educators, and partners have been dedicated to preventing crashes throughout their communities.

Watch Columbia CTST’s 23rd Year Anniversary Celebration Video:


A heartfelt “Happy Birthday” and “Thank You” to everyone on this multi-county team, past and present, for their continued support and commitment to promoting traffic safety. Together we make a difference.