Traffic Safety Talk Newsletter

Welcome to our Traffic Safety Talk newsletter – the FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) news and information update. Each issue includes recent projects, community outreach events, and safety campaigns. We discuss Traffic Safety Team materials and resources available for members. Digital flipbooks of the most recent newsletters are available. Additionally, we have included the PDF documents below to view current and past editions.

Current Traffic Safety Talk News Update • April 2024 Flip Book:

Click here for the new April Traffic Safety Talk PDF file. In this Bringing You Home Safely Since 1994 issue, various topics and projects include:

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Resource Manuals

We have compiled primary documents as a helpful resource for our Community Traffic Safety Program members and agencies in Northeast Florida, District Two. These resource manuals are a great reference to common questions and can assist while planning and improving traffic safety on our local roadways.

Traffic Safety Resource Manuals

Florida’s 2021-2025 Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP)

The Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) provides a framework for how Florida’s traffic safety partners will move toward the vision of a fatality-free transportation system. Furthermore, the SHSP is a call to action for public, private, and civic partners.

Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) PDF 2021-2025

Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways, or MUTCD, defines the standards used by road managers nationwide to install and maintain traffic control devices on all public streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. The MUTCD is published by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) under 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 655, Subpart F. Additionally, states must adopt the 11th Edition of the National MUTCD as their legal State standard for traffic control devices within two years from the effective date of January 18, 2024.

Current 11th Edition of MUTCD PDF December 2023

School Zone Speed Detection Systems:

Pursuant to Section 316.0776, Florida Statutes, the Department may approve the installation of School Zone Speed Detection Systems on the State Highway System.  Installations of these devices on the State Highway System must be authorized through a General Use Permit.  Please use the link below to access the website to read an overview of the process, the Placement and Installation Guidelines, Frequently Asked Questions, and Special Provisions that will be attached to the General Use Permit.  This process is like the process used for Automated License Plate Recognition (LPR) Systems and Traffic Infraction Detectors (Red Light Running Cameras).  Please refer to this website occasionally because the documents may be updated as this process rolls out.

School Speed Detection System (fdot.gov)

FDOT-traffic-engineering resource manual TEM

Traffic Engineering Manual (TEM)

The FDOT Traffic Engineering Manual (TEM) aims to provide traffic engineering standards and guidelines for use on the State Highway System. Furthermore, the manual covers the process whereby standards and guidelines are adopted, and chapters are devoted to highway signs, traffic signals, markings, and specialized operational topics. 

Traffic Engineering Manual PDF Effective January 1, 2023

resource manuals speed zoning

Speed Zone Manual

The Manual on Speed Zoning for Highways, Roads, and Streets in Florida, is also known as the “Speed Zone Manual.” It was created to promote uniformity in establishing state, municipal, and county speed zones throughout Florida. This FDOT Speed Zoning for Florida document complies with Chapter 316 of the Florida Statutes. Adopted for use by the State of Florida under Rule 14-15.012, Florida Administrative Code.  

Speed Zone Manual PDF Revised August 20, 2018

resource-manual-thumbnail-ICE

Manual on Intersection Control Evaluation (ICE)

The FDOT Intersection Operations and Safety developed the ICE manual, forms, tools, scope of services, and staff hour estimation. The ICE process quantitatively evaluates several intersection control scenarios. It ranks these alternatives based on their operational and safety performance. Implementing a “performance-based” procedure also creates a transparent and consistent approach.

Manual on Intersection Control Evaluation PDF Effective January 1, 2023

resource manuals TSM&O strategic plan

Transportation Systems Management & Operations (TSM&O) Strategic Plan

The ITS (Intelligent Transportation System) Strategic Plan provides statewide direction and guidance. FDOT, Florida’s Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and local governments use this Strategic Plan to plan, program, and implement integrated multi-modal ITS elements. Chiefly, the purpose is to maximize the safety and efficiency of Florida’s Transportation System. 

TSM&O Strategic Plan PDF Updated August 17, 2017

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Complete Streets Handbook

The FDOT is committed to enhancing our residents’ and visitors’ safety and mobility with Complete Streets principles. Florida’s Complete Streets 360º approach to transportation planning, design, construction, and operations focuses on identifying the right solutions for communities based on the needs and desires of all roadway users.

In addition to FDOT’s reference materials, we created an informational presentation specific to Complete Streets in Northeast Florida.

Complete Streets Handbook PDF Updated April 25, 2017

Additional Engineering and Planning Resources

Whether you have a specific project or engineering concern or want to expand your knowledge, these are useful reference materials. In addition to the above resource manuals, we provide Crash Fact Data Sheets for all 18 counties in District Two. Another resource is our Team Materials which includes traffic safety reports, Florida’s Strategic Highways Safety Plan, and our Traffic Safety Talk newsletter.

Move Over or Slow Down

Every January is Move Over Month in Florida. The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program reminds all motorists to obey Florida’s Move Over Law. This law helps to protect those who protect us while they provide essential services in a dangerous environment – the side of the road.

Florida law requires motorists to move over a lane — when they can safely do so — for the following:

  • Stopped law enforcement.
  • Emergency responders.
  • Sanitation and utility service vehicles.
  • Tow trucks or wreckers.
  • Maintenance or construction vehicles with displayed warning lights without advanced signs or channelizing devices.
  • NEW: Disabled vehicles. (effective 1/1/2024)
Move Over or Slow Down
Move Over
Slow down if unable to move over
Pull over for moving emergency and law enforcement vehicles

New Requirements Added to the Move Over Law – Effective January 1, 2024

Florida lawmakers take action to enhance protection for all roadway users. The expanded Move Over law adds three scenarios to Florida’s current law. Motorists will be required to move over if:

  • There is a disabled motor vehicle that is stopped and displaying warning lights or hazard lights.
  • If a vehicle is stopped and is using emergency flares or posting emergency signage.
  • When a vehicle is stopped and one or more persons are visibly present.

Florida’s Move Over Law Expanded in 2021

In addition to first responders, this law also applies to other public servants and roadside workers. Drivers typically know to move over for law enforcement, fire rescue, and emergency medical services. Many still do not realize the law requires them to move over for sanitation, utility, wrecker, maintenance, and construction vehicles. Basically, if motorists see a service vehicle on the side of the road with flashing warning lights, they need to change lanes or slow down.

Florida Law, Move Over and Slow Down for Stopped Emergency and Service Vehicles

The Florida requirement expanding to cover these additional roadway service providers was enacted in July 2021. In 2022, there were 170 crashes and more than 14,000 citations issued for motorists failing to move over in Florida, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV). Obeying Florida’s Move Over law will help ensure all personnel working along our roadways get home safely.

Move Over

  • As soon as it is safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to the stopped law enforcement, emergency, sanitation, utility service vehicles, tow trucks or wreckers, maintenance or construction vehicles with displaying warning lights, and any disabled vehicle on the side of the road when driving on an interstate highway or other highways with two or more lanes.
  • Always signal your intention to change lanes.
  • Be prepared to allow those who are attempting to move over into the next lane.

Slow Down

  • If moving over cannot be safely accomplished, or when on a two-lane road, slow down to a speed that is 20 mph less than the posted speed limit when the posted speed limit is 25 mph or greater, or travel at 5 mph when the posted speed limit is 20 mph or less when driving on a two-lane road.

Violating the Move Over law puts you and others at risk, and a citation will result in a fine, fees, and points on your driving record. To read the Florida Statue, see 316.126 – Operation of vehicles and actions of pedestrians on approach of an authorized emergency, sanitation, or utility service vehicle.

Pull Over for Moving Emergency Vehicles

Motorists should always remember to pay attention while driving and pull over for emergency vehicles approaching from behind. Help protect moving emergency vehicles by:

  • Yielding the right of way
  • Moving to the closest, safety edge of roadway
  • Clearing intersection
  • Remaining stopped until the vehicle has passed

Engineering Concerns

One of the most essential functions of our Traffic Safety Team is identifying problems on our local roadways. You and your colleagues are the experienced “eyes” we need on our local roads. Accordingly, we ask all FDOT District Two Traffic Safety Team members for help reporting traffic safety and engineering concerns.

Engineering Concerns Presentation Video with Examples

As a Traffic Safety Team member, we value your insight and knowledge of your community’s traffic safety issues. For example, some of the safety issues identified include: signs, pavement markings, signals and areas that may benefit from increased enforcement.

Submitting an Engineering Roadway Safety Concern

You and anyone within your organization may submit a traffic safety engineering concern through our Roadway Concerns online form. Please provide your name, email address, and phone number. This information will allow us to contact you to discuss the issue further or get more clarification and provide you with status updates and the final resolution.

Location of Concern

Enter as much information as you can about the location. Please indicate which county the issue is in so it can be forwarded to the appropriate team. If you know which agency owns the roadway, select the appropriate option. If unsure of the agency, simply select Other/Unknown, and we will update the information if needed. For Road Name, identify the primary road. If it is at an intersection, add the name of the intersection (or the closest intersecting road). For better clarification, describe the location using landmarks, direction (North, South, East, West), side of the road, and anything else that would help.

Concern Description

When inputting the concern description, tell us what E-Category:  Engineering, Education, Enforcement, or Emergency Services this concern is related to. Select the primary concern type. And in your own words, describe the roadway concern in as much detail as possible. If you have pictures, videos, or other relevant documents about the issue, please upload them. Sending images or videos is very helpful. Lastly, click the submit button to send your request.  

Submit a NE Florida Engineering Concern

Concern Submissions

After you submit your concern online, a notification is sent to the District 2 Community Traffic Safety Program. The concern is added to the database and assigned to the appropriate agency and E-category.

At the next CTST meeting, we introduce the issue to the team. We investigate the concern in a manner that may include a safety study, operations study, maintenance request, law enforcement deployment/activities, and/or educational initiatives. The issue will be discussed at each subsequent team meeting until the investigation is completed.

We will review the investigation results and the course of action, if any, at a meeting. We will also notify the requestor of the results of the findings and any actions that have or will be taken. If a request is not met or the ending result is not what the requestor was hoping for, please do not take it personally. Of course, we appreciate all of the engineering concerns submitted.

Remember… We Need Your Help

Together, we can solve roadway issues, reduce crashes, and help prevent serious injuries and fatalities. If you see a roadway safety issue in any of our 18 Northeast Florida Counties, please submit it online through the Roadway Concerns form.  Above all, we thank you for your continued commitment to safety!

Additional Resources and Information:

Additionally, you may read this 2018 presentation How to Submit Better Engineering Concerns. Bringing the 4E’s of safety together: Engineering, Education, Emergency Medical Services, and Enforcement.

Safe Communities

Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs) are synonymous with Safe Communities. These classic programs launched in the mid-1990s. They play a critical role in traffic safety, connecting local communities, identifying priority problems, and implementing countermeasures. The Northeast FDOT District Two Florida’s Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) is committed to safety and Target Zero. Florida’s traffic crashes, injuries, and fatalities are at critical levels. Our CTSTs work together to improve traffic safety and help curb dangerous driving behaviors. We bring highway safety, public health, law enforcement, and business leaders across our 18 counties. Teams address local traffic safety concerns and the ongoing roadway safety crisis.

What is a Safe Community?

Safe Communities is a model used by communities nationwide to identify and address local injury problems. Safe Communities allow citizens to predict when and where injuries are most likely to strike. And take the best course of action to keep them from happening at all. This article speaks specifically to those injuries caused by traffic crashes. However, the model can be used to address any local injury problem. Four essential characteristics define Safe Communities:

  1. Use of multiple sources of data to identify community injury problems;
  2. Citizen involvement;
  3. Expanded partnerships; and
  4. A comprehensive and integrated injury control system.

The mission of the FDOT District 2 Community Traffic Safety Program is to reduce traffic-related fatalities and injuries. We do this within our communities by solving local problems with state assistance. We strive for Florida’s goal of Target Zero, following the Safe System Approach while incorporating the fundamentals of Safe Communities.

Historical Safe Communities Documents

Safe Communities The First Six Months
The First Six Months
Safe Communities: Community Traffic Safety Outreach Featuring Florida CTST Best Practices
Safe Communities: Featuring Florida CTST Best Practices
Safe Communities Approach
An Approach to Reduce Traffic Injuries
Safe Communities Evaluating and Monitoring
Evaluating and Monitoring
Safe Communities Tool Kit
2007 Tool Kit
Safe Communities Getting Started Presentation
Getting Started Presentation

An Approach to Reduce Traffic Injuries

In 1995, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) distributed a summary, “Putting It Together: A Model for Integrating Injury Control System Elements,” describing how prevention, acute care, and rehabilitation need to work together to make progress in reducing injuries. This injury control approach has application to traffic safety. A Safe Communities approach is one way to get the injury control system components to work together to reduce injuries. (Content from NHTSA)

Motor vehicle injuries are the leading cause of all injury deaths. Motor vehicle-related injuries are the principal cause of on-the-job fatalities. Additionally, it’s the third largest cause of all deaths in the United States. Only heart attacks and cancer kill more people. However, far more people are injured and survive motor vehicle crashes than die in these crashes. Most of these injuries and deaths are not acts of fate but are predictable and preventable. Injury patterns, including traffic-related injury patterns, vary by age, gender, and cultural group. There are also seasonal and geographic patterns to injury. Once the cause of injuries is identified, interventions can be designed to address the cause. Ultimately, the goal is to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities.

Community-Based Approaches: Illustrations from Traffic Safety

Community Traffic Safety Programs were an outgrowth of the successful occupant protection and anti-drunk driving programs of the 1970s and 1980s. Historically, CTSPs combined two or more traffic safety countermeasures or interventions to address such local problems. Issues like impaired driving and infrequent use of child safety seats and safety belts. Over time, in various combinations that were appropriate to a specific community, citizen advocacy groups, law enforcement, business, public health agencies, education, the courts, and the media combined efforts by forming coalitions with elected officials and other community leaders to develop solutions to local traffic safety problems.

National Community Traffic Safety Program History

The CTSP is a national initiative established by the NHTSA and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) partnership. The program was launched in 1993 to address and prevent traffic fatalities and injuries in local communities. The CTSP built upon the strengths and resources of the two agencies’ efforts by expanding the role of engineering. Furthermore, it brings new partners like the Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Officials, and highway safety educators. The goal is to promote cooperation and trust and develop cost-effective activities, including new skills, technologies, and ideas to focus on crash-related problems. (NHTSA Corridor/Community Traffic Safety Programs Student Manual, Transportation Safety Institute 1994) 

Florida Program History

“The 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act mandated a state safety management system (SMS). The SMS integrated vehicles, drivers, and roadway elements into a comprehensive approach to solving highway safety problems. The focus of the SMS was to ensure that safety became an integral part of highway planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of all public roads. The FDOT used the CTSP and local Teams to address the SMS requirements.” (Safety Sentinel, March 1998) 

The agency decided that the best way to address safety on all public roads was a multi-disciplinary approach, with the intent to expand the CTST concept throughout the state. This would address safety problems on non-state roads. Additionally, it would provide forums for the various disciplines at the state and local levels. 

District Two CTSTs

One of the most crucial functions of a CTST is identifying and reporting problems on our local roadways. Through our monthly work addressing local roadway concerns, we bring together the 4E’s of safety: Engineering, Education, Emergency Medical Services, and Enforcement. Team members are the “eyes” of our roadways.

We know from FHWA that local agencies own approximately 75 percent of rural roads. Unfortunately, while local roads are less traveled than State highways, they have a much higher rate of serious crashes. By bringing the many community partners together to address identified issues in a community, FDOT has a connection to issues and data on local roads. Examples of some of the concerns addressed each month include requests for studies and maintenance support. Areas include school crossings, roadway hazards, road surface conditions, access problems, pedestrian and bicycle issues, micro-mobility issues, signage, pavement markings, signals, and areas that may need an increased law enforcement presence. 

Since 1994, the FDOT District Two CTSP has effectively identified local crash problems and provided solutions.