Get Out and Move for Safety!

The FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) held a successful virtual bike/walk/run challenge during the week of April 23-30, 2022. The purpose was to share traffic safety tips and promote pedestrian and bicyclist safety in Northeast Florida. In total, 43 participants registered and completed an individual 5K (3.1 miles) by cycling, walking, jogging, or running.

The inaugural Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run Virtual 5K was a great community outreach event to encourage everyone to get out and move for safety! The event helped educate motorists and vulnerable road users on safe habits while on the road. 

Once completed, participants could upload their results to their race roster participant dashboard, download their finisher certificate, and receive a digital medal. The first 10 participants to upload their results received a Traffic Safety Team hat.

Virtual race logo

The event was held to promote safety tips for pedestrians and bicyclists:

  • Wear bright colors. Increase your visibility and use bike lights/reflectors.
  • See and be seen. Make eye contact with drivers when crossing streets.
  • Be predictable. Cross streets where it is legal to do so.
  • Stop! Look left, right, and left for traffic.
  • Be prepared for the unexpected.

Let’s MOVE for SAFETY all year long! As you enjoy outdoor activities this summer, please stay hydrated by drinking plenty of water, wear sunscreen and a hat, watch for signs of heat exhaustion, take plenty of breaks from the heat, and cool off by heading into a cooled space. Wherever you drive, for work, a long road trip, the neighborhood pool, or the beach, make sure to drive safe and share the road.

Tips for Motorists, Bicyclists and Pedestrians

Share the road

Motorists:

  • Share the road with bicyclists.
  • Stop for pedestrians crossing at every intersection.
  • Stop before turning right on red.
  • Passing bicyclists too closely is dangerous and illegal.
  • Focus on the road. 
  • Avoid aggressive driving.
  • Obey the traffic laws, signals, and speed limits.
  • Look in all directions before making a turn. 
  • Do not pass a vehicle that is stopping for pedestrians.

Bicyclists: Wear a helmet when biking. If a rider or passenger is under 16, they must wear a properly fitted helmet that securely fastens to the passenger’s head by a strap. Ride on the right side of the road, with traffic flow. Use bike lanes when available. Use hand signals when turning and obey all traffic signs and signals.

Walkers and Runners: Always cross the street at corners or crosswalks. Walk or run on the far left off the side of the road, facing traffic. Use sidewalks when available. Pay attention. Constantly look and listen for vehicles.


For more information on the event or about your FDOT District Two CTSP, please email us at TrafficSafetyTeam@dot.state.fl.us.

Traffic Safety for Children

Safety rules at home, school and around the neighborhood. The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program has developed special educational content highlighting traffic safety for children. It is never too early to educate kids on safety rules – at home, at school, and around the neighborhood.

Materials include the “Safety Town” activity booklet, coloring pages, social media graphics, and videos. Please share these free resources with children in your family, classroom, or neighborhood!

Traffic Safety Videos for Kids:

Free Traffic Safety Coloring Sheets & Activity Book for Children:

Great Safety Tips for Kids:

Stroll and Roll the Right Way!

  • Walk & ride during the day when it is light out.
  • Have a buddy with you.
  • Don’t enter the road between parked cars.
  • Cross the street at a corner or crosswalk.
  • Look left, right, & left again before crossing a street.
  • Sidewalks are the safest place to walk or ride.
  • Wear a helmet every time you bike or skate.
  • Ride your bike with the flow of traffic.
  • Obey traffic signs & signals.

Children Must Wear a Bike Helmet… It’s the Law!

Florida state law requires all riders under 16 years of age to wear a helmet when on a bicycle. Additionally, any bicycle passenger aged 16 or younger, like small children riding in a bike seat or trailer, must also wear a helmet. This applies if they are on the sidewalk, road or other public roadway. The helmet must meet federal guidelines. All bike helmets should be properly fitted and securely fastened on the head with a strap.

Stranger Danger!

  • Never go up to a car or to someone you don’t know.
  • Have a safe place and people you can go to in an emergency.

Traffic Safety Storytime Videos for Children:

It is important to educate children on traffic safety, so we made four traffic safety story time videos. Two of the videos were read by kids, for kids! The books include “Watch Out On the Road,” “Learn About Road Safety,” “Look Left, Look Right, Look Left Again,” and “Franklin Rides a Bike.”


More traffic safety resources and activity sheets for children can be found by visiting the link  below:

VIRTUAL Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run

FREE VIRTUAL EVENT
April 23, 2022 – April 30, 2022
Get out and move for safety!

FDOT District 2 Community Traffic Safety Program invites you to join the traffic safety movement with this fun bike, walk or run challenge – our first ever VIRTUAL Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run!

We created this event to raise awareness about the importance of traffic, pedestrian and bicycle safety. In 2021, there were 875 pedestrian-related crashes in our Northeast Florida counties; 92 of those were fatalities. There were 500 bike-related crashes in 2021, which includes 13 fatalities. By working together, we can reduce injuries and save lives on our roadways! 

VIRTUAL Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run Rules

Complete your own 5K – that’s 3.1 miles and a great distance for beginners or exercise regulars. You can choose to cycle or two-foot it by walking, jogging, or running. If you choose to cycle, please be sure to wear a helmet! You may finish your 5K on any day, at any time, and from any location – starting on Saturday, April 23 and ending on Saturday, April 30.

Important: This event is virtual only. The registration page and emails you receive will note that the event is taking place in Jacksonville, however, there is no in-person race. 

REGISTER HERE for the VIRTUAL Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run

Invite your family and friends to join the Traffic Safety Spring Bike/Walk/Run. Be one of the FIRST 10 PARTICIPANTS to upload their results to the dashboard and WIN a FREE Traffic Safety Team hat! Everyone is a winner and will receive a FINISHER certificate. Most importantly, we want you to BE SAFE and HAVE FUN! Be sure to check out our Pedestrian Safety Tips and our Bike Safety Tips before your challenge!

Important Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Reminders for Motorists

“If only I’d been watching for pedestrians.” No Regrets When You DRIVE WITH CARE

Pedestrians are a vulnerable road user. Whether walking for enjoyment, exercise or engaged in work on the roadway, they need to be safe. Our goal is to increase driver awareness and education of pedestrian traffic safety. When driving, always remember to:

  • Stop for pedestrians crossing at every intersection.
  • Be sure to stop before tuning right on red. 
  • Look in all directions before making a turn. 
  • Do not pass a vehicle that is stopping for pedestrians.
  • Obey the traffic laws, signals and speed limits.

“If only I’d been watching for bicyclists.” No Regrets When You SHARE THE ROAD

With more and more people riding bikes as a means of transportation, exercise and recreation, it’s important for drivers and riders to be extra careful and obey the rules of the road. Drivers should always follow these basic traffic guidelines:

  • Share the road with bicyclists.
  • Stop before turning right on red.
  • Passing bicyclists too closely is dangerous and illegal. You must give 3 feet when following or passing cyclists.
  • Focus on the road. 
  • Avoid aggressive driving.
  • Obey the traffic laws, signals and speed limits.

Click here to download a printable bike and pedestrian safety flyer for motorists.


Safety Tips for Bicyclists and Pedestrians

  • Wear bright colors. Increase your visibility and use bike lights/reflectors.
  • See and be seen. Make eye contact with drivers when crossing streets.
  • Be predictable. Cross streets where it is legal to do so.
  • Stop! Look left, right, and left for traffic.
  • Be prepared for the unexpected.

Bicyclists: Wear a helmet when biking. If a rider or passenger is under 16, they must wear a helmet that is properly fitted that securely fastens to the passenger’s head by a strap. Ride on the right side of the road, with the flow of traffic. Use bike lanes when available. Use hand signals when turning and obey all traffic signs and signals.

Walkers and Runners: Always cross the street at corners or crosswalks. Walk or run on the far left off the side of the road, facing traffic. Use sidewalks when available. Pay attention. Constantly look and listen for vehicles.

Click here to for more bicycle and pedestrian safety tips.

Traffic Safety Talk Winter 2022

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program News and Information

Traffic Safety Talk Winter 2022 is now available. Click here to download the Winter 2022 edition of Traffic Safety Talk.

2021 Reflection + Planning for 2022  

The landscape of the CTSP has changed over the past year, yet we continue to expand awareness of traffic safety issues and solve local traffic safety concerns. We have met the challenge of staying positive and engaged over the past year. Team members and community partners received 47,243 emails this year. This number does not include meeting invitations. This kept us connected and gave us the ability to share important information, tips, and strategies. Through engineering, education, enforcement, emergency medical services, and by providing resources on our website and social media channels, we remain a strong voice in traffic safety.
– Andrea Atran, M.A., CPM
FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program Manager

Virtual Meetings + Engineering Concerns

Safety remains our number one goal as COVID concerns continue to impact everyone’s work and personal lives. Team meetings were held virtually through 2021 and will continue into 2022. Teams have used this opportunity to grow and welcome new members. We are proud to say our teams have risen to the challenge and continue to make progress in improving traffic safety in their communities. Over the past year, we held 72 virtual CTST meetings with a total of 924 attendees and 43 new members. Every CTST in District Two continued to address and solve traffic safety concerns. Since going virtual, we also reduced paper consumption and waste.

Picture of newsletter cover
Focused on Impaired Driving

Focused On Impaired Driving Prevention

We have promoted our annual Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver campaign and the Recipes for the Road booklet for 24 years. According to Florida’s 2021-2025 SHSP, one out of every four traffic fatalities in Florida involves a driver impaired by alcohol or drugs.

CTST Members Step Up for Safety

Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver continues to be a popular, grassroots campaign. It is focused on stopping impaired driving in Northeast Florida communities. With one out of every four traffic fatalities in Florida involving an impaired driver, according to Florida’s 2021-2025 SHSP, this safety message is a top priority for us.

CTST Members Step Up for Safety

Help Message Traffic Safety

In 2021, the majority of our content was shared electronically. We also worked on shipping out key traffic safety materials. This year, we ask for continued support in sharing traffic safety messages online, distributing information, and displaying materials. We plan to produce new activity books and traffic safety pieces in 2022.

Click here to read the complete CTSP Traffic Safety Talk – Winter 2022 Newsletter.

Traffic Safety Engineering Concerns

We rely on CTST members. Our members are local highway safety advocates. They are committed to solving traffic safety problems through a comprehensive, multi-jurisdictional, multidisciplinary approach. A major function of the CTSTs is to submit, review and address solutions for these concerns. Since last winter, we have:

  • Followed 259 Engineering Concerns
  • Received 115 New Concerns
  • Closed 117 Issues

Most Popular CTST Messages

Most Popular CTST Messages

Move Over or Slow Down

January is Move Over Month in Florida. The Northeast Florida Department of Transportation District Two Community Traffic Safety Program reminds all motorists to obey Florida’s Move Over Law which helps protect those who protect us while they provide important services in a dangerous environment – the side of the road.

In addition to first responders, this law also applies to other public servants and roadside workers. Drivers typically know to move over for law enforcement, fire rescue and emergency medical services. Many still do not realize the law requires them to move over for sanitation, utility, wrecker, maintenance, and construction vehicles. Basically, if motorists see a service vehicle on the side of the road with a flashing warning lights, they need to change lanes or slow down.

The Florida requirement expanding to cover these additional roadway service providers went into effect in July 2021. Preliminary data shows that in 2021, there were 191 crashes and more than 14,000 citations issued for motorists failing to move over in Florida, according to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles (FLHSMV). Obeying Florida’s Move Over law will help ensure all personnel working along our roadways get home safely.

Move Over

  • As soon as it is safe to do so, vacate the lane closest to the stationary emergency vehicle, sanitation vehicle, utility service vehicle, wrecker, or road and bridge maintenance or construction vehicle when driving on an interstate highway or other highway with two or more lanes.
  • Always signal your intention to change lanes.
  • Be prepared to allow those who are attempting to move over into the next lane.

Slow Down

  • If moving over cannot be safely accomplished, slow down to a speed that is 20 mph less than the posted speed limit when the posted speed limit is 25 mph or greater; or travel at 5 mph when the posted speed limit is 20 mph or less when driving on a two-lane road.

Violating the Move Over law puts you and others at risk, and a citation will result in a fine, fees, and points on your driving record. To read the Florida Statue, see 316.126 – Operation of vehicles and actions of pedestrians on approach of an authorized emergency, sanitation, or utility service vehicle.

Pull Over for Moving Emergency Vehicles

Motorists should always remember to pay attention while driving and pull over for emergency vehicles approaching from behind. Help protect moving emergency vehicles by:

  • Yielding the right of way
  • Moving to the closest, safety edge of roadway
  • Clearing intersection
  • Remaining stopped until the vehicle has passed