Resource Manuals

We have compiled primary documents as a helpful resource for our Community Traffic Safety Program members and agencies in Northeast Florida, District Two. These resource manuals are a great reference to common questions and can assist while planning and improving traffic safety on our local roadways.

Traffic Safety Resource Manuals

Florida’s 2021-2025 Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP)

The Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) provides a framework for how Florida’s traffic safety partners will move toward the vision of a fatality-free transportation system. Furthermore, the SHSP is a call to action for public, private, and civic partners.

Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) PDF 2021-2025

Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways, or MUTCD, defines the standards used by road managers nationwide to install and maintain traffic control devices on all public streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. The MUTCD is published by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) under 23 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 655, Subpart F. Additionally, states must adopt the 11th Edition of the National MUTCD as their legal State standard for traffic control devices within two years from the effective date of January 18, 2024.

Current 11th Edition of MUTCD PDF December 2023

School Zone Speed Detection Systems:

Pursuant to Section 316.0776, Florida Statutes, the Department may approve the installation of School Zone Speed Detection Systems on the State Highway System.  Installations of these devices on the State Highway System must be authorized through a General Use Permit.  Please use the link below to access the website to read an overview of the process, the Placement and Installation Guidelines, Frequently Asked Questions, and Special Provisions that will be attached to the General Use Permit.  This process is like the process used for Automated License Plate Recognition (LPR) Systems and Traffic Infraction Detectors (Red Light Running Cameras).  Please refer to this website occasionally because the documents may be updated as this process rolls out.

School Speed Detection System (fdot.gov)

FDOT-traffic-engineering resource manual TEM

Traffic Engineering Manual (TEM)

The FDOT Traffic Engineering Manual (TEM) aims to provide traffic engineering standards and guidelines for use on the State Highway System. Furthermore, the manual covers the process whereby standards and guidelines are adopted, and chapters are devoted to highway signs, traffic signals, markings, and specialized operational topics. 

Traffic Engineering Manual PDF Effective January 1, 2023

resource manuals speed zoning

Speed Zone Manual

The Manual on Speed Zoning for Highways, Roads, and Streets in Florida, is also known as the “Speed Zone Manual.” It was created to promote uniformity in establishing state, municipal, and county speed zones throughout Florida. This FDOT Speed Zoning for Florida document complies with Chapter 316 of the Florida Statutes. Adopted for use by the State of Florida under Rule 14-15.012, Florida Administrative Code.  

Speed Zone Manual PDF Revised August 20, 2018

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Manual on Intersection Control Evaluation (ICE)

The FDOT Intersection Operations and Safety developed the ICE manual, forms, tools, scope of services, and staff hour estimation. The ICE process quantitatively evaluates several intersection control scenarios. It ranks these alternatives based on their operational and safety performance. Implementing a “performance-based” procedure also creates a transparent and consistent approach.

Manual on Intersection Control Evaluation PDF Effective January 1, 2023

resource manuals TSM&O strategic plan

Transportation Systems Management & Operations (TSM&O) Strategic Plan

The ITS (Intelligent Transportation System) Strategic Plan provides statewide direction and guidance. FDOT, Florida’s Metropolitan Planning Organizations, and local governments use this Strategic Plan to plan, program, and implement integrated multi-modal ITS elements. Chiefly, the purpose is to maximize the safety and efficiency of Florida’s Transportation System. 

TSM&O Strategic Plan PDF Updated August 17, 2017

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Complete Streets Handbook

The FDOT is committed to enhancing our residents’ and visitors’ safety and mobility with Complete Streets principles. Florida’s Complete Streets 360º approach to transportation planning, design, construction, and operations focuses on identifying the right solutions for communities based on the needs and desires of all roadway users.

In addition to FDOT’s reference materials, we created an informational presentation specific to Complete Streets in Northeast Florida.

Complete Streets Handbook PDF Updated April 25, 2017

Additional Engineering and Planning Resources

Whether you have a specific project or engineering concern or want to expand your knowledge, these are useful reference materials. In addition to the above resource manuals, we provide Crash Fact Data Sheets for all 18 counties in District Two. Another resource is our Team Materials which includes traffic safety reports, Florida’s Strategic Highways Safety Plan, and our Traffic Safety Talk newsletter.

Complete Streets

The Community Traffic Safety Program in Northeast Florida is committed to education, outreach, and the Target Zero goal of reducing serious injuries and deaths on our roadways. This presentation explains why FDOT’s Complete Streets are essential for safety and mobility. Learn about the policy, design guidance, strategies, and project examples.

Watch the video presentation of Complete Streets:

Because most of Florida’s population growth and development occurred in the “age of the automobile,” our transportation system can be challenging to non-motorized road users—pedestrians and cyclists. Complete Streets are essential for the safety and mobility of vulnerable road users.

The presentation includes national and Florida bicycle and pedestrian crash trends. In 2019, Florida had the highest number of bicycle fatalities. Pedestrian crashes account for approximately 20 percent of the fatal crashes in the 18 counties comprising District Two.

Recognizing these challenges, the FDOT Complete Streets policy was officially adopted in 2014. The approach for the Department is to consider all users of all ages and abilities in how it plans, designs, builds, and operates its transportation system. Complete Streets are roads designed not only for passenger cars and trucks but also for transit riders, pedestrians, and cyclists.

Flip through the Complete Streets presentation:

The context classification system broadly identifies the various built environments in Florida based on the general characteristics of land use, development patterns, and connectivity along a state roadway. These attributes provide cues to the types of uses that will likely utilize the road. This is used to make decisions about design parameters. The presentation provides an overview of each roadway context class.

Eight Context Classifications can be found throughout Northeast Florida:

  • C1 Natural – lands preserved in a natural or wilderness condition, including lands unsuitable for settlement due to natural conditions.
  • C2 Rural – sparsely settled areas which may include agricultural land, woodland, and wetlands.
  • C2T Rural Town – rural and natural areas immediately surround small concentrations of developed regions.
  • C3R Suburban Residential – primarily residential uses within large blocks and a disconnected, sparse major roadway network.
  • C3C Suburban Commercial – mostly non-residential uses with large building footprints and parking lots. Buildings are within large blocks and a disconnected/sparse roadway network.
  • C4 Urban General – areas with a mix of uses set within small blocks with a well-connected roadway network.
  • C5 Urban Center -typically concentrated around a few blocks and identified as part of a civic or economic center of a community with a well-connected grid network.
  • C6 Urban Core – areas with the highest densities and building heights within large, urbanized areas. Buildings have mixed uses and are close to roadways with a well-connected grid network.
  • LA Limited Access – roadways with grade separation and limited access, such as interstates and expressways.

Examples of strategies used in District Two to make streets safer and more complete for all users:

Towards the presentation’s conclusion are examples of successful Complete Streets projects in the Northeast Florida area, including before and after photos. One project on US 17/Main Street in Jacksonville reduced lane widths to provide space for a landscaped median and introduced street trees, enhanced crosswalks, and other features to manage speeds. As a result, it improved safety and made the roadway more accommodating for pedestrians.

Another example is along Archer Road in a more suburban area of Gainesville; we see how lane widths were reduced to provide for bicycle lanes. For instance, the introduction of a mid-block crosswalk to improve pedestrian connectivity.

A shared-use path was constructed on the right-of-way along State Road 207, a rural highway in East Palatka. The design and operation of the roadway were left unchanged for motorists. However, the new pathway provides for safer mobility of cyclists and pedestrians along the road.

We hope you take this opportunity to learn about Complete Streets and try new transportation options. The state of Florida celebrates Mobility Week to promote awareness of safe, multimodal transportation choices. Additionally, please check out our bicycle and pedestrian resources, and share the traffic safety messages.