Target Zero

The Northeast Florida Community Traffic Safety Program is working to improve how we connect, interact, plan, design, educate, and solve traffic safety concerns as part of Target Zero.

On average, eight people are killed, and 49 are seriously injured on Florida’s roads daily. In most of those severe and fatal crashes, driver behavior is a contributing factor. This initiative focuses on connecting, interacting, and designing our transportation system to specifically relate to those (drivers) most involved in crashes resulting in serious injuries and fatalities.

Learn more about Florida’s Target Zero

In Florida, Target Zero builds upon the Vision Zero belief by focusing on influencing dangerous driver behaviors before serious and fatal crashes occur. Target Zero aligns resources and establishes actions for all safety partners to take evolutionary steps to improve how Florida connects, interacts, plans, designs, operates and maintains its transportation system.

Eliminating roadway fatalities is our highest priority. We recognize that achieving zero deaths and serious injuries will not be easy and will require commitment, energy, and innovation. Together, we can make progress to achieve our target of ZERO.  

Zero is our goal. A Safe System is how we will get there.

To address the high number of fatal and serious injuries resulting from vehicle crashes, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has made a commitment to zero deaths by adopting the Safe System Approach. This holistic view of the road system anticipates human mistakes and keeps impact energy on the human body at tolerable levels. Safety is an ethical imperative for everyone, including users, designers, and owners of the transportation system.

The Safe System Approach is based on six principles:

  • Death and serious injury are not acceptable.
  • Humans make mistakes.
  • Humans are vulnerable.
  • Responsibility is shared.
  • Safety is proactive.
  • Redundancy is crucial.

Five elements that work together for a safer and more accessible transportation system that aim to reduce severe injuries and fatalities:

  • Safer Roadways – This includes design and planning to make roadways more forgiving of human mistakes by separating users in time and space. Examples include dedicated bicycle lanes or the implementation of pedestrian scrambles where only pedestrians are given dedicated time and space to navigate intersections.
  • Safer Speeds – The magnitude of speed is directly correlated to the survivability of a crash. Mitigation examples include implementing countermeasures such as lane narrowing or speed feedback signage or designing context-based roadways that set “target speed” goals to ensure that if a crash occurs, it is at a speed at which humans can survive.
  • Safer Road Users – This includes ALL road users and encompasses shared responsibility. Users must practice safe behavior, such as using raised medians that protect pedestrians when crossing and make them more visible.
  • Safer Vehicles – Employing safety measures in vehicles that help prevent crashes or reduce the magnitude of a crash can reduce fatalities and serious injuries. Examples include autonomous braking, lane departure warnings, and driver alcohol detection systems.
  • Post-Crash Care – This can ensure that when a crash occurs, the proper emergency response is deployed, and all traffic incident management systems work in unison. This includes the integration of emergency vehicle preemption or automatic crash notification systems.

Safe System Approach vs. Traditional Road Safety Practices

Whereas traditional road safety strives to modify human behavior and prevent all crashes, the Safe System approach also refocuses transportation system design and operation on anticipating human mistakes and lessening impact forces to reduce crash severity and save lives.

Traditional Approach

Prevent crashes
Improve human behavior
Control speeding
Individuals are responsible
React based on crash history

Safe System Approach

Prevent deaths and serious injuries
Design for human mistakes/limitations
Reduce system kinetic energy
Share responsibility
Proactively identify and address risks

Northeast Florida is Focused on Target Zero

FDOT District Two is committed to employing the Safe System Approach in plans and projects. Everyone needs to share in the responsibility; everyone has a role! Below is additional information available:

Florida Traffic Safety Coalitions

Florida’s statewide traffic safety coalitions and programs focus on strategies to reduce serious injuries and fatalities on our roadways through teamwork and partnerships in addressing traffic safety locally, regionally, and statewide. These coalitions support Florida’s State Highway Strategic Plan (SHSP) emphasis areas and bring partners together to analyze data, create strategic action plans, implement programs, and monitor performance. Traffic safety is most effective when employing measures of engineering, education, enforcement, and emergency response as well as information intelligence, innovation, insight into communities, and investment and policies. Coalition members include community officials, agencies, advocacy groups, business partners, and membership organizations.

2021 Florida Traffic Safety Coalition and Resource Center Contact List and Information
2021 Florida Traffic Safety Coalition Campaign Calendar


Coalitions:

Florida Impaired Driving Coalition logo

Florida Impaired Driving Coalition:
The FIDC was formed in 2009 to identify and prioritize impaired driving issues and develop a plan to maximize the State’s ability to impact these crashes.

Ride Smart Florida logo

Florida Motorcycle Safety Coalition:
Ride Smart Florida is a resource for motorcyclists that includes education and training, safety strategies, motorcycle data, and more. It provides support to local communities and motorcycle clubs through access to public service announcements, motorcycle‐related statistics, rider education information, and links to other websites related to motorcycle safety.

Florida Occupant Protection logo

Florida Occupant Protection Coalition:
The FOPC was formed to identify and prioritize Florida’s occupant protection issues by reviewing proven strategies and discussing promising new practices.

Alert Today Alive Tomorrow logo

Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Coalition:
FDOT’s “Alert Today Alive Tomorrow” campaign is presented via TV, radio, social media, transit advertising, local education, and enforcement activities. The message that “Safety Doesn’t Happen by Accident” is a reminder for all roadway users to pay attention and follow the rules of the road.

Safe Mobility for Life logo

Florida’s Safe Mobility for Life Coalition:
This coalition’s mission is to implement a strategic plan to increase safety, access, and mobility for aging road users and eliminate fatalities and reduce serious injuries.

Teen Safe Driving coalition

Florida Teen Safe Driving Coalition:
This coalition was formed to establish a culture of a safe teen driving by engaging, educating, and mobilizing all members of a community to work collectively to develop and improve safe teen driving programs, practices, and activities.

TRCC

Florida Traffic Records Coordinating Committee:
This committee brings together agencies that are interested in reducing traffic injuries and deaths by improving the timeliness, accuracy, completeness, uniformity, integration, and accessibility of traffic records data.

Florida Traffic Safety Resource Centers:

Florida Occupant Protection Resource Center

Florida Occupant Protection Resource Center:
This center was created to be a one-stop resource center that provides equipment, educational, and promotional materials on all aspects identified by FDOT as critical strategic highway safety occupant safety elements.

Ped Bike Resource Center

Florida’s Pedestrian & Bicycling Safety Resource Center:
This center promotes safe pedestrian and bicycling activities for citizens and visitors, young and old, through educational materials and information to advocate groups in the state.


Northeast FDOT CTSP and the Florida traffic safety coalitions plan and maintain projects. They also review crash data to evaluate the SHSP progress. Members identify relationships between contributing factors, including time/day, demographics, driver behaviors, environmental and roadway conditions, high risk locations, and emerging issues in key emphasis areas. Click here to read the Florida SHSP, Target Zero Fatalities & Serious Injuries.