Districtwide Discussions

Because of numerous requests for our Districtwide Discussion presentations, we are including them below to serve you better, our District Two Traffic Safety Team members. For those who have been following these districtwide hot topics, it’s been a beneficial conversation. While looking at these slides offers a glimmer into the ongoing dialogue, it’s not the same as being present and a part of the discussions.

Thank you to everyone who has joined the conversation across our 18-county district. There has been a lot of valuable input, experience, and expertise from team members. View Florida statutes, local guidelines, ordinances, news articles, reports, and materials submitted by other team members. Please share any new data or information.

November Presentation – School Zone Camera Enforcement and Traffic Safety Roadway Concerns

November’s Districtwide Discussion included a follow-up about the new Florida law allowing camera enforcement of school zone speed limits. FDOT District Two Traffic Operations Engineer, Jim Hannigan, discussed school zone camera enforcement requirements and guidelines, which will be finalized by the end of December. Additionally, an in-depth presentation reviewed traffic safety roadway concerns, submissions, and the process within our Community Traffic Safety Teams in Northeast Florida.

School Zone Speed Detection Systems UPDATE:

Pursuant to Section 316.0776, Florida Statutes, the Department may approve the installation of School Zone Speed Detection Systems on the State Highway System.  Installations of these devices on the State Highway System must be authorized through a General Use Permit.  Please use the link below to access the website to read an overview of the process, the Placement and Installation Guidelines, Frequently Asked Questions, and Special Provisions that will be attached to the General Use Permit.  This process is like the process used for Automated License Plate Recognition (LPR) Systems and Traffic Infraction Detectors (Red Light Running Cameras).  Please refer to this website occasionally because the documents may be updated as this process rolls out.

School Speed Detection System (fdot.gov)


Resources are compiled on these two web pages:

September Presentation – Ongoing Districtwide Discussions

In September, we had a productive dialogue about these ongoing electric micromobility device and golf cart concerns. We covered hot topics in the news (lithium-ion fire hazards and college campus bans on e-bikes/e-scooters), increased injury impacts, developing golf cart crossing, e-scooter research, and ideas for future discussions.


June Presentation – Continuing the Discussion on E-Mobility Devices and Golf Carts

June 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

June’s Districtwide Discussion, Follow-Up on E-Mobility Devices and Golf Carts, we addressed the challenges of collecting data, local regulations, insurance and liability concerns, and designing for safe behaviors.


May Presentation – Golf Cart/LSV Concerns and Follow-Up on E-Mobility Devices

June 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

In May, the Districtwide Discussion presentation introduced concerns in Northeast Florida about street-legal golf carts (low-speed vehicles). We also continued the discussion on the issues regarding electric mobility devices.


April Presentation – Let’s Talk About E-Bikes, E-Scooters, and E-Unicycles

April 2023 Districtwide Discussion Presentation

During the April Districtwide meeting presentation, we discussed the population growth in Florida and existing pedestrian and bicycle crash data. Data documenting e-bike and other electric mobility device crashes and injuries is needed. We looked at other states’ guidelines and local beach communities whom have established ordinances addressing e-bike usage.


This year, we began virtual, open discussion meetings on special topics with Andrea Atran, District Two Community Traffic Safety Program Manager. The goal is to encourage conversations on districtwide issues. The informal gathering is an excellent opportunity for members across our 18-county district to connect, ask questions, and share their expertise. In February, we reviewed safety grants. And in March, we discussed the history of the CTSP and the importance of engineering concerns. This led to concerns regarding micromobility – specifically, e-bikes and e-scooters.

Tackling these topics is a group effort. Bringing everyone together to address issues affecting our communities is what we are about. Additionally, we look forward to future Districtwide Discussions and new topics for collaboration.

Mocktails • Recipes • Safety Tips

Seasonal Mocktails, Recipes and Traffic Safety Tips

These delicious nonalcoholic drink mocktails, recipes, and safety tips are part of the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver and Recipes for the Road campaigns. The FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program has produced unique mocktails and shared nonalcoholic drinks from local Northeast Florida restaurants and bars since 1997. In 2017, we launched our first recipe videos for the 20th Annual Recipes for the Road edition and celebrated our 25th edition in 2022.

We hope you watch, share, and enjoy our alcohol-free drink recipes, appetizer and meal recipes, and safe ABCs of partying tips below. EVEN ONE DRINK of alcohol can slow your reflexes and reaction time, reduce your ability to see clearly and make you less alert. Be a part of a safety culture focused on preventing injuries and fatalities on our roads.

Favorite Florida Recipes and Refreshments

Shamrock Mocktini Jell-O Shot
Lucky Lime Punch
Mango Smoothie
Pineapple Mock-Margarita
Strawberry Basil Infused Water
Sparkling Cherry Love Potion

Check out our alcohol-free cocktails and food recipes for all the festive holidays and events. We’ve got something for everyone: Sweet Valentine’s Day, spicy Super Bowl Sunday, lucky St. Patrick’s Day, and festive Cinco de Mayo. All-American observation days like Memorial Day, Independence Day / 4th of July, and Labor Day are also included. Don’t forget about spooky Halloween, family Thanksgiving or Friends-Giving days, holiday office or neighborhood parties, Christmas, and New Year’s Eve.

Party Favorite Food Recipes

Sweet & Salty White Chocolate Snack Mix
Festive Holiday Cranberry Brie Appetizer Bites
Chicken Enchilada Quinoa Soup
Cheesy Breadstick Twists
Meatball Slider Pull-Apart Appetizer

All American Alcohol-Free Drinks Perfect for Spring and Summer Holidays, Events, and BBQs

Honey Tea Watermelon Smoothie
Strawberry-Lemonade Slushy
Patriotic Red, White, and Blue
Fresh Soft Seltzers
Non-Alcoholic Summer Sangria

Nonalcoholic beverages are becoming ever more popular. Trendy virgin cocktails are great for office parties, family gatherings, and social events. There are health benefits to reducing or eliminating alcohol in your diet. Mocktails offer a tasty alternative for designated drivers. Awareness months like Sober October and Dry January promote this healthier lifestyle.

Nonalcoholic Holiday Recipes for all Special Occasions

Grasshopper Mocha Mocktail
Peach Bella Bellini
Cran-Raspberry Holiday Punch

Candy Cane Mocktini
Nojito Mojito
Sparkling Strawberry Mandarin Mocktail
Hot Citrus Cider
Dreamy Hot Cocoa Recipe and The Marshmallow Snowman
Green Grinch Punch Recipe and Grinch Kabob Instructions

Fall Favorites in Florida are Cool and Refreshing for a Thanksgiving Feast

Pumpkin Spice Smoothie
Festive Sparkling Punch
Apple Cider Float

Nonalcoholic Halloween-Inspired Drink Recipes

Spooky Fruity Mocktail
Witches Brew and Bat Straw
Wormy Halloween Party Punch

The A.B.C. Recipe for Hosting a Safe Party

A – Alcohol Awareness

  • Always serve food with alcoholic beverages.
  • Food slows down the absorption rate of alcohol into the body.
  • Offer non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Make guests feel welcome, no matter what they choose to drink.

B – Buffet

  • Serve protein-rich and starchy foods throughout the evening.
  • By eating first, partygoers may drink less, and the food will help slow the absorption of alcohol into their bloodstream.
  • As the hour becomes late, put away the alcoholic beverages, but continue to offer a good supply of food.
  • Remember, only time will eliminate alcohol from the body.

C – Carpool or Cab

  • Encourage family and friends to ride together and have a pre-selected designated driver.
  • Provide alternatives for guests who may have had too much to drink.
  • Have someone who has not been drinking drive them home.
  • Call a cab or ride-share for guests to have a safe ride home.
  • Let the person sleep overnight rather than getting in their car while intoxicated.

Recipe Cards and Traffic Safety Tips

Click on the images below to view free downloads to print and share on social media with family and friends! Check out more “Summer Celebrate Safely” recipe cards.

Super Bowl Mocktail Drink RecipeTraffic Safety Holiday Cookie RecipeTraffic Safety Candy Cane Desert RecipeHoliday Mocktail Recipes Celebrate SafelyTraffic Safety Jaguar Football Mocktail Drink Recipe
Thanksgiving Cookie RecipeHalloween Smoothie RecipeLabor Day Lemon Freeze RecipeLabor Day Celebrate SafelyLabor Day Traffic Safety

Always Celebrate Safely

Please be responsible! Designate a sober driver or call a cab/rideshare service if you’ve been drinking. If you are hosting a party, offer alcohol-free beverages to guests using these recipe cards and videos!

We produce a Recipes for the Road book each year, available to our communities and online through social media. The alcohol-free recipes are a big hit on Pinterest, YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram. Many thanks to our CTST Team members, volunteers, and partners who share our passion for reducing alcohol-related traffic crashes and fatalities in our communities!

To view all editions of Recipes for the Road, click here. Visit our Impaired Driving safety page and our Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver campaign for more information and resources.Save

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Safe Communities

Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs) are synonymous with Safe Communities. These classic programs launched in the mid-1990s. They play a critical role in traffic safety, connecting local communities, identifying priority problems, and implementing countermeasures. The Northeast FDOT District Two Florida’s Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) is committed to safety and Target Zero. Florida’s traffic crashes, injuries, and fatalities are at critical levels. Our CTSTs work together to improve traffic safety and help curb dangerous driving behaviors. We bring highway safety, public health, law enforcement, and business leaders across our 18 counties. Teams address local traffic safety concerns and the ongoing roadway safety crisis.

What is a Safe Community?

Safe Communities is a model used by communities nationwide to identify and address local injury problems. Safe Communities allow citizens to predict when and where injuries are most likely to strike. And take the best course of action to keep them from happening at all. This article speaks specifically to those injuries caused by traffic crashes. However, the model can be used to address any local injury problem. Four essential characteristics define Safe Communities:

  1. Use of multiple sources of data to identify community injury problems;
  2. Citizen involvement;
  3. Expanded partnerships; and
  4. A comprehensive and integrated injury control system.

The mission of the FDOT District 2 Community Traffic Safety Program is to reduce traffic-related fatalities and injuries. We do this within our communities by solving local problems with state assistance. We strive for Florida’s goal of Target Zero, following the Safe System Approach while incorporating the fundamentals of Safe Communities.

Historical Safe Communities Documents

Safe Communities The First Six Months
The First Six Months
Safe Communities: Community Traffic Safety Outreach Featuring Florida CTST Best Practices
Safe Communities: Featuring Florida CTST Best Practices
Safe Communities Approach
An Approach to Reduce Traffic Injuries
Safe Communities Evaluating and Monitoring
Evaluating and Monitoring
Safe Communities Tool Kit
2007 Tool Kit
Safe Communities Getting Started Presentation
Getting Started Presentation

An Approach to Reduce Traffic Injuries

In 1995, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) distributed a summary, “Putting It Together: A Model for Integrating Injury Control System Elements,” describing how prevention, acute care, and rehabilitation need to work together to make progress in reducing injuries. This injury control approach has application to traffic safety. A Safe Communities approach is one way to get the injury control system components to work together to reduce injuries. (Content from NHTSA)

Motor vehicle injuries are the leading cause of all injury deaths. Motor vehicle-related injuries are the principal cause of on-the-job fatalities. Additionally, it’s the third largest cause of all deaths in the United States. Only heart attacks and cancer kill more people. However, far more people are injured and survive motor vehicle crashes than die in these crashes. Most of these injuries and deaths are not acts of fate but are predictable and preventable. Injury patterns, including traffic-related injury patterns, vary by age, gender, and cultural group. There are also seasonal and geographic patterns to injury. Once the cause of injuries is identified, interventions can be designed to address the cause. Ultimately, the goal is to reduce the number of injuries and fatalities.

Community-Based Approaches: Illustrations from Traffic Safety

Community Traffic Safety Programs were an outgrowth of the successful occupant protection and anti-drunk driving programs of the 1970s and 1980s. Historically, CTSPs combined two or more traffic safety countermeasures or interventions to address such local problems. Issues like impaired driving and infrequent use of child safety seats and safety belts. Over time, in various combinations that were appropriate to a specific community, citizen advocacy groups, law enforcement, business, public health agencies, education, the courts, and the media combined efforts by forming coalitions with elected officials and other community leaders to develop solutions to local traffic safety problems.

National Community Traffic Safety Program History

The CTSP is a national initiative established by the NHTSA and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) partnership. The program was launched in 1993 to address and prevent traffic fatalities and injuries in local communities. The CTSP built upon the strengths and resources of the two agencies’ efforts by expanding the role of engineering. Furthermore, it brings new partners like the Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Officials, and highway safety educators. The goal is to promote cooperation and trust and develop cost-effective activities, including new skills, technologies, and ideas to focus on crash-related problems. (NHTSA Corridor/Community Traffic Safety Programs Student Manual, Transportation Safety Institute 1994) 

Florida Program History

“The 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act mandated a state safety management system (SMS). The SMS integrated vehicles, drivers, and roadway elements into a comprehensive approach to solving highway safety problems. The focus of the SMS was to ensure that safety became an integral part of highway planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of all public roads. The FDOT used the CTSP and local Teams to address the SMS requirements.” (Safety Sentinel, March 1998) 

The agency decided that the best way to address safety on all public roads was a multi-disciplinary approach, with the intent to expand the CTST concept throughout the state. This would address safety problems on non-state roads. Additionally, it would provide forums for the various disciplines at the state and local levels. 

District Two CTSTs

One of the most crucial functions of a CTST is identifying and reporting problems on our local roadways. Through our monthly work addressing local roadway concerns, we bring together the 4E’s of safety: Engineering, Education, Emergency Medical Services, and Enforcement. Team members are the “eyes” of our roadways.

We know from FHWA that local agencies own approximately 75 percent of rural roads. Unfortunately, while local roads are less traveled than State highways, they have a much higher rate of serious crashes. By bringing the many community partners together to address identified issues in a community, FDOT has a connection to issues and data on local roads. Examples of some of the concerns addressed each month include requests for studies and maintenance support. Areas include school crossings, roadway hazards, road surface conditions, access problems, pedestrian and bicycle issues, micro-mobility issues, signage, pavement markings, signals, and areas that may need an increased law enforcement presence. 

Since 1994, the FDOT District Two CTSP has effectively identified local crash problems and provided solutions.

W.H.A.L.E. Check Program

We Have A Little Emergency – W.H.A.L.E. CHECK Child Passenger Safety Program

Now is the time to educate new parents and caregivers about Florida’s Child Passenger Safety (CPS) laws and guidelines. The W.H.A.L.E. Check program is an excellent resource with important child passenger information and recommendations. Please help us raise awareness and prevent tragedies among our most precious cargo.

The number of U.S. births rose in 2021. The modest 1% gain is more like a baby bump than a baby boom. However, according to new Census Bureau data, Florida’s population also grew by 1.9% from July 2021 to July 2022 – the most significant increase of any US state. Since 2016, some District Two counties have seen even higher growth. St. Johns County has grown by 24% and Nassau County by 16.5% over the last six years. With this baby and population increase in Northeast Florida, there is a need to strengthen child passenger safety education and outreach.

whale check program flyer

Free Resource: Child Passenger Safety Flyer

Available statewide as a digital download courtesy of FDOT District Two: Click here to download the W.H.A.L.E. Check as a one-page, printable PDF flyer. You can print any quantity you need at a reasonable cost on white 8.5×11 label sheets! They are great to distribute at car seat checks, traffic safety events, daycare centers, pediatrician offices, government agencies, and hospitals. Parents and caregivers can read the car seat guidelines and tips, fill out their contact information for emergency personnel, and adhere it along with the two W.H.A.L.E. Check logos onto the child’s car seat.

Child Passenger Safety Awareness and Education

FDOT UF Shands Health WHALE Check Program

Child Passenger Safety Week is September 15-21, 2024, and National Seat Check Saturday is September 21.  Please share this vital child passenger safety information to help reach the goal of zero roadway deaths for our little ones.

Additionally, we designed a special edition in the orange and blue colors of UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital for their partnership with Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals for them to print and distribute in their communities in and around Gainesville.

The W.H.A.L.E. Check program was first introduced in May of 2002 in Jacksonville, Florida, by Northeast FDOT District Two’s Community Traffic Safety Program. This is a child passenger safety education and identification program for parents and caregivers in Florida. In the event of an automobile crash, children are often too young to identify themselves or provide helpful information.

Parents and guardians are encouraged to complete the sticker and place it on the back of the child’s car seat to provide vital contact information to emergency personnel. We suggest users stick the two smaller labels on each side of the car seat. These alert rescuers that the occupant is participating in W.H.A.L.E. Check.

Our popular and nationally recognized W.H.A.L.E. Check campaign remains highly requested and distributed material with important child occupant protection education and information. Almost 300,000 printed W.H.A.L.E. Checks have been distributed in Northeast Florida since being launched. Over 1,656 digital versions have been viewed or downloaded from this website. The site has received over 10,000 social media W.H.A.L.E. Check impressions just in the last several years. Watch the video above to learn more about how the program works.

w.h.a.l.e. check program

Free Social Media Graphic

Click here to download this CPS social media image to help promote the W.H.A.L.E. Check program. Don’t forget to tag us!
@trafficsafetyteam on Facebook and Instagram 
@trafficsafetyfl on Twitter and Pinterest


The W.H.A.L.E. Check informational flyer also includes child safety seat advice and guidelines. Here are five safety tips to help prevent injuries in case of a car crash:

  1. WEAR YOUR SAFETY BELT: Studies show that if you wear your seat belt, your kids will too.
  2. Follow manufacturer’s instructions: Always check the manual for both your
    car and the child safety seat for proper installation guidelines.
  3. Seat strapped in tight: You should not be able to move the car seat more than one inch
    in any direction at the belt path, and always use the top tether when forward facing.
  4. Chest clip at armpit level & harness snug: Straps should be tight enough
    so that you cannot pinch the fabric of the harness at the shoulders.
  5. Back seat is safest: Children age 13 and under should ride in the back seat.
    Older children no longer need a special seat if their legs bend comfortably at the
    seat’s edge with their back resting flat against the back of the seat.

We follow these American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations and want all children safeguarded in the right car seat:

  • Birth – 12 Months: Babies under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.
  • 1 – 3 Years: Toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car seat with a harness as long as possible – until they reach the top height or weight limit of the seat, typically around 35 to 45 pounds.
  • 4 – 7 Years: Young children should ride in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until they reach the top height or weight limit of the seat – typically between 40 and 60 pounds.
  • 8 – 12 Years: Children should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they are at least 4 feet 9 inches tall. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lies snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach, and the shoulder belt lies snug across the shoulder and chest, not over the neck or face.

Child passenger safety has dramatically evolved over the past decade; however, motor vehicle crashes continue to be the leading cause of death for children 4 years and older. This policy statement provides 4 evidence-based recommendations for best practices in the choice of a child restraint system to optimize safety in passenger vehicles for children from birth through adolescence: (1) rear-facing car safety seats as long as possible; (2) forward-facing car safety seats from the time they outgrow rear-facing seats for most children through at least 4 years of age; (3) belt-positioning booster seats from the time they outgrow forward-facing seats for most children through at least 8 years of age; and (4) lap and shoulder seat belts for all who have outgrown booster seats. In addition, a fifth evidence-based recommendation is for all children younger than 13 years to ride in the rear seats of vehicles. It is important to note that every transition is associated with some decrease in protection; therefore, parents should be encouraged to delay these transitions for as long as possible. 

From the American Academy of Pediatrics, Child Passenger Safety Technical Report

Crash Data and 2022 Annual Report

This page includes the most recent FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program (CTSP) Annual Report and Crash Data Reports. Listed below, we provide crash facts for each of the 18 Northeast Florida counties in District Two. We also have combined districtwide totals. This resource is for our local Traffic Safety Team members, partners, and agencies.

CTSP Annual Report

A summary of last year’s Northeast Florida Community Traffic Safety Program and combined crash facts from District Two. This resource may be used and shared among our Traffic Safety Team members, partners, and agencies. In addition to the crash facts for 12 Florida Strategic Highway Safety Plan emphasis areas, we highlight traffic safety efforts and community outreach in 2022 with overviews on topics addressed throughout the year. These reports are a fundamental evaluation tool as we work toward reducing injuries and deaths on our roadways. Together, we can make progress to achieve our target of ZERO.

2022 District Two Crash Data Summaries

The Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) includes roadway, user behavior, and road user emphasis areas. The crash data includes total crashes, fatalities, and injuries for each emphasis area. This year, we changed the format to incorporate demographics and key factors in the crashes. We broke out the crashes by age and gender of the at-fault driver. Also included on each fact sheet are brief takeaway points. Click here to review crash data reports by county and from previous years.

INTERSECTION Crash Data – 2022 Roadway Crash Fact Reports
OCCUPANT PROTECTION Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
IMPAIRED DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
DISTRACTED DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
AGGRESSIVE DRIVING Crash Data – 2022 User Behavior Crash Fact Reports
BICYCLIST Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
PEDESTRIAN Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
MOTORCYCLIST Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
AGING DRIVER Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
TEEN DRIVER Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports
COMMERCIAL VEHICLE Crash Data – 2022 Road User Crash Fact Reports

Northeast Florida County Data Resources

We have county crash data available with previous years’ summary reports. Our team materials page has additional resources, information, newsletters, and Florida reports. These resources evaluate and establish traffic safety concerns and trends in Northeast Florida. Our Community Traffic Safety Teams work to make safety improvements with the goal of reducing crashes and saving lives.