Traffic Safety Talk October 2019

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program News and Information

Click here to download the October 2019 edition of Traffic Safety Talk.

The FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program’s (CTSP) mission statement is to reduce traffic-related fatalities and injuries. The premise of the program is local communities, solving local problems with state assistance.

Highway safety is at its best when we can address driver behavior, road conditions and vehicle factors as three interacting aspects of collision and injury prevention. Through events, on-going educational programs and projects, individuals and agencies are combining resources to improve awareness and understanding of safety issues on a local level.

You are part of our multi-county Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs). By working together we can address all facets of safety, not just parts of the problem. Our “T.E.A.M” philosophy is successful when we all do our part. Augmenting our efforts toward a common goal of reducing the number and severity of traffic crashes and saving lives within our communities. T.E.A.M. = Together Everyone Achieves More

I commend our partners for their active participation and on-going commitment to traffic safety in our 18 county district. I invite you to be a part of the solution. Help us to promote safety on our roadways and move toward zero fatalities.  -Andrea Atran

CTST Meetings and Training

Every year 64 team meetings are planned and take place at eight locations in our district. This year we hosted two training days in Alachua County and Duval County.

Engineering Concerns

Over a 12 month period, 286 roadway concerns have been submitted through our Community Traffic Safety Teams. Some of the safety issues identified include: roadway departure hazards, road surface conditions, narrow roadways and bridges, railroad crossings, work zones, intersections, roadway design limitations, roadway access problems, pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

To submit a concern, click on “Roadway Concerns”. Complete online form with detailed location and issue descriptions. Upload a photo or video and submit. Once knowledgeable team members identify a concern, we can conduct a study, prioritize improvements, schedule and implement, then evaluate effectiveness.

Teen Driving Initiative

Our goal is to improve safety belt use among teenage motorists in their communities. The first step is to accurately identify seat belt usage percentages at local high schools utilizing the Florida Safety Belt Observation Form. Preliminary data collected at two high schools in Gainesville, Florida indicated a lower percentage than the Florida Statewide Observational Survey of Safety Belt Use.   

To view the complete newsletter showcasing our newly illustrated W.H.A.L.E. Check, Celebrate Safely, Activity Book for Kids, and Safety Bookmarks, click here: October 2019 edition of Traffic Safety Talk.

 

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Safety for Kids

New child safety activity book and safety bookmarks are now available!


Activity Book

Our cool new activity booklet was also developed and printed in a two-part flip book for elementary age children and preteens. For the younger kids, ages 5-10, we have the “Safety Scores! On your way to school, at home, and off to play.” with great safety tips, fun puzzles and activities. The other part targets the older tween age kids from 10-13, challenging them to “Up Your Safety Game! Phone Down. Eyes Up. Buckle Up!”

Important traffic safety messages and activities cover a wide range of topics, including: child passenger safety (CPS), occupant protection, pedestrian safety, bike and helmet safety, ATV off-road safety and school bus dangers and safety. In addition, there are other key safety concerns for kids like swimming, sports, fire hazards and general everyday safety tips. We’ve got mazes, puzzles, coloring, games, crosswords, word searches, scrambles, trivia and safety check lists to keep the kids engaged while emphasizing valuable safety knowledge, reminders of best practices and fundamental safety rules to help prevent injuries or death.

Elementary – Sample Pages
 Activity Book - Elementary Pages - ATV Safety Message  Activity Book - Elementary Pages - Occupant Protection Safety Message  Activity Book - Elementary Pages - Water Safety Message
Pre Teens – Sample Pages
 Activity Book - Pre Teens Pages - Crossing Safety Message  Activity Book - Pre Teens Pages - Bike Helmet Safety Message  Activity Book - Pre Teens Pages - Sport Safety Message

Bookmarks

These double-sided bookmarks contain important safety messages for bicycle safety, distracted driving, pedestrian safety, and occupant protection tips for drivers and users. They are distributed to libraries throughout our community. Click on a design below to learn more about that particular topic!

 

 

Bicycle Safety Distracted Driving Pedestrian Safety Occupant Protection
Safety Bookmark - Bicycle Safety Message Safety Bookmark - Distracted Driving Safety Message Safety Bookmark - Pedestrian Safety Message Safety Bookmark - Occupant Protection Safety Message

 

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W.H.A.L.E. Check Program

W.H.A.L.E. CHECK Program 

Introducing a fresh new W.H.A.L.E. (We Have A Little Emergency) Check artwork for Florida’s child passenger safety program. Our widely popular and nationally recognized W.H.A.L.E. Check campaign continues as a highly requested and distributed piece on important child occupant protection and car seat safety.  W.H.A.L.E. Check is made available statewide as a digital download courtesy of District Two.

W.H.A.L.E. Check is a child passenger safety education and identification program for parents and caregivers. In the event of an automobile crash, children are often too young to identify themselves or provide helpful information. Parents/guardians are encouraged to complete the sticker and place on the back of the child’s car seat to provide vital contact information for emergency personnel. They are to stick the two smaller labels on each side of the car seat. These alert rescuers that the occupant is participating in W.H.A.L.E. Check.

Click here to download the W.H.A.L.E. CHECK as a one-page, printable PDF flyer to distribute at car seat checks, traffic safety events, daycare centers, pediatrician offices, government agencies and hospitals throughout Florida.

order-formOccupant Protection Campaign – Order Online Now

 



The informational piece also includes great child safety seat tips and guidelines! There are five smart safety tips to help prevent injuries in case of a car crash:

  1. WEAR YOUR SAFETY BELT: Studies show that if you wear your seat belt, your kids will too.
  2.  Follow Manufacturer’s instructions: Always check the manual for both your
    car and the child safety seat for proper installation guidelines. 
  3. Seat strapped in tight: You should not be able to move the car seat more than one inch
     in any direction at the belt path, and always use the top tether when forward facing.
  4. Chest clip at armpit level & Harness Snug: Straps should be tight enough
    so that you cannot pinch the fabric of the harness at the shoulders.
  5. Back Seat is Safest: Children age 13 and under should ride in the back seat.
    Older children no longer need a special seat if their legs bend comfortably at the
    seat’s edge with their back resting flat against the back of the seat.

We follow these American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations and want all children safeguarded in the right car seat!

  • Birth – 12 Months: Babies under age 1 should always ride in a rear-facing car seat. There are different types of rear-facing car seats: Infant-only seats can only be used rear-facing. Convertible and 3-in-1 car seats typically have higher height and weight limits for the rear-facing position, allowing you to keep your child rear-facing for a longer period of time.
  • 1 – 3 Years: Toddlers should ride in a rear-facing car seat with a harness as long as possible – until they reach the top height or weight limit of the seat, typically around 35 to 45 pounds.
  • 4 – 7 Years: Young children should ride in a forward-facing car seat with a harness until they reach the top height or weight limit of the seat – typically between 40 and 60 pounds.
  • 8 – 12 Years: Children should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they are at least 4 feet 9 inches tall. Seat belts fit properly when the lap belt lies snugly across the upper thighs, not the stomach, and the shoulder belt lies snug across the shoulder and chest, not over the neck or face.
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2019 Training Day

Thank you for attending the 2019 Traffic Safety Team Member Training Days in Gainesville and Jacksonville!

If you were not able to attend—here’s what you missed! All of the presentations are now available for download!
Be sure to check out and share the photos from both trainings too!

Team Packet


Team Member Tools


Photo Galleries

Gainesville Training Jacksonville Training

 

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2019 Traffic Engineering Manual – Now Available!

The Florida Department of Transportation Traffic Engineering and Operations Office has officially released the 2019 Traffic Engineering Manual. The Traffic Engineering Manual can be found on the Traffic Services Office website at:

http://www.fdot.gov/traffic/TrafficServices/Studies/TEM/TEM.shtm

The January 2019 Traffic Engineering Manual is effective January 1, 2019.

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