Happy Birthday District Two Traffic Safety Teams

We are excited to celebrate the 25th birthday of Duval County’s Community Traffic Safety Team (CTST)!

Duval County’s CTST was established on March 30, 1995. They were the second team organized in the Northeast Florida region and part of the Florida Department of Transportation District Two’s Community Traffic Safety Program.

25 Year Anniversary Celebration Photo Slide Show of the Duval County CTST: 

Over the last quarter century, the Duval CTST has been recognized by groups like NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) and AAA for their wonderful efforts in promoting traffic safety. Through the years, Duval team members have gone above and beyond to help improve and educate issues regarding traffic safety on our roadways. They have been an integral part of solving traffic safety concerns in their community. These dedicated members include city, county, state, private industry and citizens, all working together with state assistance to reduce local traffic-related fatalities and injuries throughout Duval County.
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Mocktails • Recipes • Safety Tips

Monthly Mocktails and Food Recipes

Over the last two decades we have made a positive impact to help keep people safe on our roads during the holidays and throughout the year. These delicious mocktails, recipes and safety tips are part of the Celebrate Safely, Designate a Driver program, Recipes for the Road and Seasons of Safety campaigns.

Watch + Share Our Non-Alcoholic Drink and Food Recipe Videos:

Lucky Lime Mocktail Punch

Sparkling Strawberry Mandarin Mocktail Video Recipe

Souper-Bowl: Chicken Enchilada Quinoa Soup Recipe

Happy New Year’s Minty Raspberry Nojito Mojito Mocktail
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Traffic Safety Talk October 2019

FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program News and Information

Click here to download the October 2019 edition of Traffic Safety Talk.

The FDOT District Two Community Traffic Safety Program’s (CTSP) mission statement is to reduce traffic-related fatalities and injuries. The premise of the program is local communities, solving local problems with state assistance.

Highway safety is at its best when we can address driver behavior, road conditions and vehicle factors as three interacting aspects of collision and injury prevention. Through events, on-going educational programs and projects, individuals and agencies are combining resources to improve awareness and understanding of safety issues on a local level.

You are part of our multi-county Community Traffic Safety Teams (CTSTs). By working together we can address all facets of safety, not just parts of the problem. Our “T.E.A.M” philosophy is successful when we all do our part. Augmenting our efforts toward a common goal of reducing the number and severity of traffic crashes and saving lives within our communities. T.E.A.M. = Together Everyone Achieves More

I commend our partners for their active participation and on-going commitment to traffic safety in our 18 county district. I invite you to be a part of the solution. Help us to promote safety on our roadways and move toward zero fatalities.  -Andrea Atran

CTST Meetings and Training

Every year 64 team meetings are planned and take place at eight locations in our district. This year we hosted two training days in Alachua County and Duval County.

Engineering Concerns

Over a 12 month period, 286 roadway concerns have been submitted through our Community Traffic Safety Teams. Some of the safety issues identified include: roadway departure hazards, road surface conditions, narrow roadways and bridges, railroad crossings, work zones, intersections, roadway design limitations, roadway access problems, pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

To submit a concern, click on “Roadway Concerns”. Complete online form with detailed location and issue descriptions. Upload a photo or video and submit. Once knowledgeable team members identify a concern, we can conduct a study, prioritize improvements, schedule and implement, then evaluate effectiveness.

Teen Driving Initiative

Our goal is to improve safety belt use among teenage motorists in their communities. The first step is to accurately identify seat belt usage percentages at local high schools utilizing the Florida Safety Belt Observation Form. Preliminary data collected at two high schools in Gainesville, Florida indicated a lower percentage than the Florida Statewide Observational Survey of Safety Belt Use.   

To view the complete newsletter showcasing our newly illustrated W.H.A.L.E. Check, Celebrate Safely, Activity Book for Kids, and Safety Bookmarks, click here: October 2019 edition of Traffic Safety Talk.

 

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Bicycle Safety

The Adventures in Biking Safely – March is Florida Bicycle Month!

FDOT D2 CTST FL Traffic Bike SafetyFlorida’s weather in March is perfect for biking, so get out and ride. With many drivers and cyclists on the road this month, let’s gear up with some bicycle safety reminders.

Drivers: Share the road with bicyclists and always pass or follow cyclists with at least a 3 foot barrier.

Bicyclists: Wear a helmet, ride on the right and make sure drivers can see you with bright clothing and reflectors or lights on your bike.

For more important bicycle safety tips, crash facts and resources, go to our traffic safety bike page here.


UNF Gets New Bike Fix-It Stations

What a perfect way to kick off bicycle month! We are excited to share the new bike stations provided by the FDOT Northeast Florida, and located at the University of North Florida. Your Traffic Safety Team worked with UNF Police Department to coordinate the installation and identification of locations for students – great for quick and easy bicycle repairs to help bike safe!

FDOT D2 CTST Bike Fixit Station at UNF FDOT D2 CTST Bike Fixit Station at UNF

 

The self-serve bike repair stations are free to use. They contain air pumps along with a variety of tools to help riders work on their bikes. Located around the UNF campus at: Crossings Bike Station Q Building, Fountains Bike Station, Hall Landing Bike Station, and Village A Building Bike Station.

FDOT D2 CTST Bike Fixit Station at UNF FDOT D2 CTST Bike Fixit Station at UNF

 

 

 

 

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HAWK

HAWK is a Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon Traffic System

Guide to HAWK = High-Intensity Activated CrossWalk

Your Community Traffic Safety Team presents this important new traffic system operating instructions. Watch the video above to learn what drivers and pedestrians should do when they approach a HAWK Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon. You may also flip through the book below or download the PDF “HAWK 101 Guide” by FDOT Northeast Florida District Two.

No Regrets When You DRIVE WITH CARE & CROSS WITH CARE

HAWK Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon Operation:

STEP 1 

• Drivers will see all indication lights are dark when there is no pedestrian waiting to cross, and the pedestrian signal will maintain a “DON’T WALK” symbol.

• Pedestrians who want to cross the street will need to push the button to activate the system.

STEP 2 

• Drivers will see a FLASHING YELLOW light for a few seconds when pedestrians push the button. Drivers should reduce speed and prepare to stop.

• Pedestrians will still see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and should wait.

STEP 3 

• Drivers will see the flashing go to a STEADY YELLOW light, warning them the indication will soon turn to a STEADY RED light.

• Pedestrians continue to see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and should remain waiting.

STEP 4 

• Drivers will see a STEADY RED light, which requires them to STOP at the stop line.

• Pedestrians will then see a “WALK” symbol to cross and should look in both directions to make sure all vehicles are stopped.

STEP 5 

• Drivers will see ALTERNATING FLASHING RED lights, as pedestrians cross the street. During this period, drivers are required to STOP and then they may proceed with caution if crosswalk is clear.

• Pedestrians will see the WALK indication change to a flashing countdown that indicates how much time they have remaining to cross the street.

STEP 6 

• Drivers will see all lights are back to dark at the end of the flashing countdown and may continue to proceed through the crosswalk if it is clear.

• Pedestrians will see the “DON’T WALK” symbol and must push the button to activate the system again.

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